English Literature and Language

School

School of Humanities and Social Sciences

School Dean

Christopher J. Frost, Ph.D.

Department

English

Program Director

Gwen Diaz, Ph.D.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Generally, admission is granted to those with high promise for success in graduate study. Potential may be demonstrated by experience in increasingly responsible positions, previous schooling, and test scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) recorded within the past five years.

A minimum GPA of 3.0 is acceptable, with special consideration given to course work in English.

Generally, the student is expected to score within the top 35% of the verbal section and the top 35% of the analytical section of the GRE as reported for the year in which it is taken.

If students are otherwise highly qualified, they may take the GRE during their first semester of enrollment, with further enrollment contingent upon receipt of test scores.

Program in English Literature and Language

EN 6000X. Maintaining Matriculation. 0 Semester Hours.

EN 6300. Intro to Academic Writing International Students. 3 Semester Hours.

The course would enable graduate students to increase their written and reading fluency in English. The emphasis in this course is on understanding the structure of a paragraph, the function of a topic sentence, the use of supporting details and how to give sources credit, the use of transitional expressions, and academic grammar usage leading toward the composition of an essay to meet American academic standards. International students who do not meet the Graduate Studies English proficiency minimum are required to enroll in EN 6300 and EN 6301. While a grade of B or higher must be earned in the course(s), the course(s) will not count toward the student’s graduate grade point average (GPA).

EN 6301. Academic Writing for International Students. 3 Semester Hours.

The course would enable graduate students to read and respond to academic texts written in English by evaluating and responding to texts ranging from narratives to essays and becoming familiar with the wide range of rhetorical options available—narration, classification, and argument. The course is structured so that students have the opportunity to interact with texts while working with grammatical structures and new vocabulary. The conventions of a research paper differ from country to country and ESL graduate students will learn American academic requirements about how incorporate original thought, critical analysis, citation of academic texts, and synthesis of a topic as well as become familiar with standards of academic honesty in written work. International students who do not meet the Graduate Studies English proficiency minimum are required to enroll in EN 6300 and EN 6301. While a grade of B or higher must be earned in the course(s), the course(s) will not count toward the student’s graduate grade point average (GPA).

EN 7170. Directed Readings. 1 Semester Hour.

This course is an opportunity for the student to explore an area of literature of their particular interest with a professor who specializes in the area of choice. To be arranged with consent of professor and Graduate Director.

EN 7270. Directed Readings. 2 Semester Hours.

This course is an opportunity for the student to explore an area of literature of their particular interest with a professor who specializes in the area of choice. To be arranged with consent of professor and Graduate Director.

EN 7301. Contemporary Literary Criticism. 3 Semester Hours.

This course offers a background in current literary criticism including approaches such as: Psychoanalytical, Feminist, Postmodern, and Postcolonial. Students are introduced to key thinkers in each school of criticism. These critical approaches are applied to a selection of contemporary masterpieces, such as, Proust, Poe, Kafka, Fuentes, Hawthorne, and Borges.

EN 7302. Myth and Psyche in 20th Century Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

This course focuses on myth as a source of knowledge of the human psyche and rests theoretically on the findings of Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and Jacques Lacan, who provide through myth a wealth of knowledge about human values, fears, and obsessions. The works of literature to be analyzed are 20th century classics by writers such as Kafka, Sartre, Garcia-Marquez, and Lessing.

EN 7303. Critical Approaches to the Short Story. 3 Semester Hours.

The course will be divided between the "classic stories by classic writers" and the contemporary stories that are revitalizing the short story form in America and throughout world literature. The course will benefit writers and teachers, as well as all those who wish to understand how the short story has emerged as a major form of literary expression in our age.

EN 7304. Satire in English Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

A satisfactory definition of satire is as slippery as an eel. Satire is perhaps the liveliest kind of writing and as old as literature itself. The Greeks developed it, yet it was the Romans who named it. It is still much alive in our time. Theorists agree that the essential elements are wit, humor, and attack. The classical view of satire emphasized its moral intent. The modern view focuses also on its techniques.

EN 7306. Theories of Psychoanalytic Literary Criticism. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is a survey of 20th Century psychoanalytic theory as it relates to literary criticism. Theorists to be studied are Freud, Jung, Lacan and their followers. Some feminist psychoanalytic thinkers will be studied as well.

EN 7307. Courtly Love and Social Discourse. 3 Semester Hours.

This course introduces students to major works from Old and Middle English literature, such as Beowulf, “Dream of the Rood”, The Canterbury Tales, and various fictions of the Grail including “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” and Le Morte d'Arthur.

EN 7309. Seminar in Medieval Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

This course introduces students to major works from Old and Middle English literature, such as Beowulf, “Dream of the Rood”, The Canterbury Tales, and various fictions of the Grail including “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” and Le Morte d’Arthur.

EN 7311. Comparative Literature: Modern & Postmodern. 3 Semester Hours.

By concentrating on the fascinating phenomenon of postmodernism, this course develops a thorough perspective of contemporary literature from modernity to recent days. It also sharpens analytical skills through the study of critical theories that define the Postmodern. Works will range from Kafka and T.S. Eliot to Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar, Marguerite Duras, Margaret Atwood, and Thomas Pynchon.

EN 7312. Literature of the Renaissance. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is designed to provide graduate students with a detailed survey of non-dramatic poetry and prose of the early Tudor and Elizabethan periods. The course will examine selected texts from an historical perspective with special emphasis on the development of literary genres during the sixteenth century. Political, philosophical and social issues of the period will be raised as we consider the debates that shaped the poetics of the early and High Renaissance. Readings include Sir Thomas, Sir Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and many more.

EN 7313. Realism and Naturalism in the American Novel. 3 Semester Hours.

Based in historical interpretation, this course offers the first literature of the modern, mass society we ourselves live in. The interpretive strategy will consider the complex, self-contradictory nature of a literary construct as it reflects its social context. We will cover eight novels (none very long), among which are Rebecca Harding Davis's Margaret Howth, Elizabeth Stuart Phelp's Doctor Zay, Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn, Henry James's The Bostonians, and Edith Wharton's The Reef.

EN 7314. International Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to literary masterpieces of the Western World while placing them in the cultural and geo-temporal context in which they arose. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the various cultural and aesthetic movements and how they evolved. Some of the authors to be read are Sophocles, Cervantes, Moliere, Mary Shelley, Jean Paul Sartre, and T.S. Eliot.

EN 7315. American Transcendentalism. 3 Semester Hours.

This course defines Romanticism by exploring its origins and development in 19th and 20th century American history, culture, and literature. The course should provide an in-depth philosophical approach to American literature, as well as an increased ability to read literature critically. We will study works by the following authors: Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickenson, Hawthorne, Alcott, James, Poe, Frost, Welty, Stevens, and Percy.

EN 7316. History of the American Novel. 3 Semester Hours.

As a comprehensive overview of the American novel, this course offers on highly representative novel from each literary period with additional attention to minority fiction. Periods and possible authors are as follows: Neo-Classical (Brockden Brown), Low Romantic (Cooper), Romantic (Melville), Realist (James), Naturalist (Wharton), Modernist (Faulkner), and others.

EN 7317. The American Novel: Multicultural Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

This course examines the work of contemporary American writes from the many cultures that make-up the United States of America, specifically Latino American, African/Black American, Asian American, Middle Eastern American, Indian American, and Native American writers. The course emphasizes critical reading, critical writing, and critical analysis of the work and application of multicultural theory. Scholarly research and writing emphasized and required.

EN 7318. Nineteenth Century British Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

This course will trace some of the defining 19th Century cultural concerns and various aesthetic approaches to these. The following writers will be studied:Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Bronte, Pater, Rossetti, and Wilde.

EN 7320. Writers & Their Works. 3 Semester Hours.

This course focuses in detail on the works of 1 or 2 of the following: Shakespeare (Major Plays); T.S. Elliot, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman; Faulkner and Hemingway; D.H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf; W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, and Virginia Woolf.

EN 7321. Shakespeare's Major Plays. 3 Semester Hours.

The course follows four Shakespeare plays through the centuries, examining how they were treated--or mistreated--during the Restoration, and during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Film versions of the plays will be compared with Shakespeare's text. The course also traces the main lines of Shakespeare criticisms from Ben Johnson to Benard Spivak.

EN 7322. T.S. Eliot, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman. 3 Semester Hours.

This course will examine the new structures and underlying philosophies in the poetry of Whitman, Dickinson, and Eliot.

EN 7323. Faulkner & Hemingway. 3 Semester Hours.

This course will examine the concepts of transcendentalism, realism, and modernism through a study of the works of Faulkner and Hemingway.

EN 7324. D.H. Lawrence & virginia Woolf. 3 Semester Hours.

In this course we will study the major fiction of two contemporary modernists whose original experiments with technique are responsible for the modern novel and whose versions of reality challenged Victorian constructs of gender and class.

EN 7331. Writing Assessment. 3 Semester Hours.

This course asks, "What is good writing?" Through holistic grading, portfolio grading, and other types of grading, students learn how to evaluate all types of writing. Both discussion and a final project teach students to derive their own conclusions about good writing through process instead of product. This course also involves multicultural, gender, class, and age issues in writing.

EN 7332. Persuasive Writing. 3 Semester Hours.

Based on the analysis of classic and contemporary approaches to persuasive writing, the student will learn to develop strong and convincing arguments. Writing Intensive Course.

EN 7333. Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. 3 Semester Hours.

This course surveys and analyzes contemporary mainstream rhetorical theory. Students will be introduced to current thinkers in the field and will learn to apply the theories to the text.

EN 7334. Approaches to Teaching Writing Critical Thinking. 3 Semester Hours.

EN 7335. History of the English Language. 3 Semester Hours.

This course explores the development of the English language historically – where it has come from and where it seems to be going. The two main foci are (1) the history of language as it developed and changed in England and ultimately the United States; and (2) how the development of a language is impacted by socio-historical reality of its speakers.

EN 7341. Analysis and Criticism of Television and Film. 3 Semester Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major critical and analytical approaches to the study of television and film and to help students apply these approaches to individual films and television programs. Once learned, these skills can be applied in a classroom setting or used to enhance one's own viewing. After you take this course, television and film will never be the same again.

EN 7343. Linguistics: Voice and Text. 3 Semester Hours.

This course will explore the various types of discourse drawing upon the methods of discourse analysis - Austin Speech Act Theory, Bakhtin’s concept of Heteroglossia, Habermas’ concept of Communicative Ethics.

EN 7344. Discourse Analysis: Words and Actions. 3 Semester Hours.

This course introduces students to the exploration of key theories and methods of discourse analysis in regard to both spoken discourse (talk) and written discourse 199 (txt). This course familiarizes students with the ways in which language helps communicate personal, social, and cultural meanings in a wide variety of texts and talk. The course has a particular focus on the relationship between the work words do and the power relationship inherent in communicative relationships.

EN 7351. Fiction: The Creative Process. 3 Semester Hours.

This course focuses on writing short fiction. Students also work on related forms such as dramatic nonfiction, narrative essays, profiles, and personal narrative construction in short works by recent authors, in particular, complication and resolution, foreshadowing and pace, audience, and point of view. The chief emphasis of the course, however, will be given to developing the student's own voice and style.

EN 7352. Poetry: The Creative Process. 3 Semester Hours.

This course combines the study of contemporary poetry and poetics with the writing and workshopping of poetry. The course will examine poetry by major writers since Eliot, Stevens, and Bishop, including work by Denise Levertov, Anne Sexton, Richard Hugo, Sylvia Plath, W.S. Merwin, Nikki Giovanni, Charles Simic, Rita Dove, and others. Students will write and workshop a number of their own poems for the course and will select one contemporary poet to study in some detail for a final essay to be presented to the class.

EN 7353. Writing for Publication. 3 Semester Hours.

This writing course is designed to train student writers in "writing for publication" and in the methodologies for getting their work published. The student will learn to target writing for a market, to become acquainted with copyright problems, style sheets, manuscript preparation, and the publishing industry.

EN 7361. Theory of Comedy/Tragedy in Various Literary Genres. 3 Semester Hours.

This course focuses on literature of all genres in order to develop a clear notion and appreciation for the literary forms of comedy and tragedy.

EN 7362. Peace & Violence in Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is an exploration of literature that centers on the topics of peace and violence as they are portrayed in a selection of international works of diverse times throughout history.

EN 7370. Special Studies in Literature & Language. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is an opportunity for the student to explore an area of literature of the particular interest with a professor who specializes in the area of choice. To be arranged with consent of professor and Graduate Director.

EN 7380. Project. 3 Semester Hours.

The project is an original work based on academic research in the field. The length of the project is considerably more extensive than that of a final graduate class paper, but not as extensive as the thesis. The topic of the project is agreed upon by the student and the graduate director. Together they will pick one professor as chair of the project.

EN 7390. Thesis Research. 3 Semester Hours.

Prior to writing a Master's thesis, students are required to develop and defend a thesis proposal and actively engage in thesis research. The thesis proposal will include a statement of the research goals, a review of the pertinent literature/bibliographical sources, and written statement of the proposed project to include in which way the project is original.

EN 7391. Thesis. 3 Semester Hours.

The thesis is a culminating research manuscript which provides a record of a student’s achievement in the program. The thesis requires research leading to the discovery of new knowledge or original enhancement of existing knowledge in the field of interest. The thesis should include thematic, formal and theoretical components. The thesis requires a panel of three professors who will guide the student. These professors will be selected in consultation with the graduate director.

EN 7396. English Intership in Teaching and Research. 3 Semester Hours.

This internship is designed to provide the student with real experience in teaching, research, and/or writing. The student will work closely with a specific professor as an apprentice, allowing him or her to get teaching experience in assignment design, classroom management, and commenting on student work. The student will work closely with the professor to develop research goals, conduct research, identify possible outlets (conferences or journals), and produce a project. Registration in this course requires approval by the Graduate Director.

EN 7690. Thesis. 6 Semester Hours.

The thesis is a culminating experience which provides a record of a student¿s achievement in the program. The thesis in literature involves literary analysis that differs from sociological analysis in that it most often works with long established materials rather than with new materials. Thus the material has already been commented on. One does not make an observation about the world and then see when literature has commented on the background of it. Rather, one contends immediately with a critical position: there is no thesis without dealing with secondary materials as part of the field of analysis. One cannot talk about a problem in literature and then talk about the secondary materials. Secondary materials are not merely supportive; they are part and parcel of the primary problem.

Alan Cirlin, Ph.D.
Professor

Gwendolyn Diaz Ridgeway, Ph.D.
Professor

Mary Lynne Hill, Ph.D.
Professor

William Israel, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Camille Langston, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Kathleen Maloney, Ph.D.
Associate Professor