Counseling and Human Services

School

College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

School Dean

Leona Pallansch, Ph.D.

Department

Counseling & Human Services

Department Chair

Dan Ratliff, Ph.D.

Clinical Mental Health Counseling:

The Clinical Mental Health Counseling program is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP) This program uses traditional classroom teaching methods, role play and clinical experiences, online and written assignments, and testing as some of the methods of instruction. Students are required to practice counseling at the Family Life Center, a department run clinic, and in community settings. Students are required to pass a comprehensive examination as part of this degree program.

Program Director

Melanie C. Harper, Ph.D.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Admission is granted only to those who show high promise of success in master's study. Generally, students must meet the following minimum criteria to be considered for admission:

  1. Have a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university.
  2. Satisfactory scores on the General Test of the GRE or MAT are required (not required for applicants who already have a master’s degree).
  3. Have positive recommendations from past employers and/or from faculty members of previous undergraduate studies.
  4. Have a personal statement that indicates interest in becoming a professional counselor or doing work that requires counseling skills.

Counselor Education and Supervision

The Counselor Education and Supervision program is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP ). This program uses traditional classroom teaching methods; clinical, teaching, and research experiences; online and written assignments; and testing as some of the methods of instruction. Students are required to pass a comprehensive examination and complete a dissertation as part of this degree program.

Program Director

Melanie C. Harper, Ph.D.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Admission is granted only to those who show high promise of success in doctoral study. Generally, students must meet the following minimum criteria to be considered for admission:

  1. Have a master's degree in counseling or a closely related mental health area of study (for example, clinical psychology, social work, art therapy, or marriage and family therapy) from an accredited college or university.  If the master’s degree was not in Counseling or was not from a CACREP-accredited program, then leveling courses may be required to bring the training up to the level expected in a CACREP-accredited master's counseling program.
  2. Satisfactory scores on the General Test of the GRE are required.
  3. Have positive recommendations from past employers relating to professional counseling experience, as well as from faculties of previous graduate studies.
  4. Have a personal statement that indicates interest in becoming a counselor educator, counselor supervisor, leader in the counseling profession, and/or doing work that requires advanced counseling or research skills. The faculty expects doctoral students to be licensed or certified mental health professionals, to be working on licensure or certification, or to be planning to work in an environment that does not require licensure or certification (such as a religious setting or a foreign country). Applicants who are not licensed or certified should address the lack of a license or certification in the personal statement. Applicants who recently graduated from a master’s program can do this by providing a timeline for expected licensure or certification and describing the steps the applicant has already taken to achieve licensure or certification.
  5. Have a positive recommendation from the Graduate Admissions Committee of the Department of Counseling.
  6. A successful interview with department faculty.
  7. Show potential in the areas of research and writing, as evidenced by previous coursework and/or experience.

Students who meet the minimum criteria are not guaranteed admission. Enrollment is limited to approximately ten full-time equivalent students per year, and each individual's application is evaluated as a whole, taking into account his or her strengths, weaknesses, background, and personal goals. The faculty also attempts to assess the personal characteristics of applicants and to admit for study those individuals who are judged to have the greatest potential for success in the academic program and as professional practitioners after graduation. Generally, the selection process involves choosing among highly qualified applicants, rather than qualified and unqualified applicants.

Master's Programs in Counseling and Human Services

Doctoral Programs in Counseling and Human Services

CN 6000X. Maintaining Matriculation. 0 Semester Hours.

CN 6123. Seminar in Counseling. 1 Semester Hour.

CN 6150. Group Counseling Methods. 1 Semester Hour.

Theory and practice in group work. Psychological foundations of group work, including group guidance, growth groups and group counseling and therapy, with an opportunity to apply experientially the basic principles of group leadership. Limited enrollment.

CN 6251. Advanced Professional Issues and Organization/Administration. 2 Semester Hours.

Introduction to counseling services in schools, community centers and other helping agencies and private practice. Basic philosophy and objectives of guidance, counseling and therapy programs. Overview of roles, structures, functions, resources and other topics related to the organization of human services programs.

CN 6253. Group Process. 2 Semester Hours.

Theory and practice in group work. Psychological foundations of group work, including group guidance, growth groups and group counseling and therapy, with an opportunity to apply experientially the basic principles of group leadership. Limited enrollment.

CN 6282. Hope, Resilience and Human Transcendence. 2 Semester Hours.

This course will cover main aspects of positive and existential counseling including the emphasis on character strengths, total wellbeing, self and group efficacy, happiness and life satisfaction as well as human resilience and flow. It will examine how human thoughts, emotions, spirit, behaviors, and social connections contribute to a life worth living. Hope-instilling intervention skills designed to assist clients view and transform stressful circumstances into growth experiences and regard daily experiences as meaningful will be covered. The emphasis will be on learning about what is right with people, their resilience, their spirituality, their character strengths, their willingness to serve, their capacity for doing evil, their sources of happiness, their life-impeding social realities, their empowering connections, their life-enhancing social structure, and their human potential.

CN 6321. Assessment and Appraisal in Counseling. 3 Semester Hours.

This course instructs students in how to learn how to measure healthy human processes, optimal mental health, vital balance and life-impeding factors. It will provide students with a basic framework for understanding the functions and limits of testing and measurement. Basic principles, research, and theories on the measurement of psychological constructs and clinical diagnosing and their significance of treatment will be covered. Theories and techniques of administering, scoring, and interpreting psychological tests within the cultural context will be emphasized.

CN 6323. Seminar in Counseling. 3 Semester Hours.

Special interest seminars covering topics in Counseling.

CN 6341. Introduction to Neuropsychological Theory. 3 Semester Hours.

Understanding of the purpose, administration, and interpretation of the neuropsychological test battery. Overview of neurological theory and praxis with a complete neuropsychological battery in the classroom. The counselor learns when to refer a client for neuropsychological testing and how to work with appropriate mental health professionals.

CN 6352. Career Planning. 3 Semester Hours.

Selection and use of the career information; community resources; survey of theories of vocational choice; use of interest and aptitude inventories in career development; personnel selection procedures; individual and group vocational counseling; placement and follow up procedures.

CN 6354. Introduction to Counseling. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is designated to introduce students to the counseling profession. Students will explore the history of the counseling profession, the organizations that contribute to the counseling profession, training, and credentialing standards within the profession, ethical and legal standards of conduct within the profession, the scope of practice for counselors, current issues that counselors face, and the necessity and methods for maintaining wellness as a counselor. The instructor will work with the students to help them develop their professional identity as members of the counseling profession.

CN 6355. Theories of Counseling. 3 Semester Hours.

This course provides a detailed review of the theoretical foundations of major counseling theories. Reviewed theories include Psychoanalytic, Neo-Freudian, Person-Centered, Gestalt Therapy, Existentialist, Behaviorist, Transactional Analysis, Rational Emotive Therapy, and Reality Therapy.

CN 6356. Counseling Techniques. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic counseling microskills via role plays and readings. Students' abilities to select appropriate microskills and use them are evaluated through video recordings, self-critiques, quizzes and exams. This course also presents a general model of counseling.

CN 6357. Counseling Practicum. 3 Semester Hours.

Students apply counseling principles and procedures to develop skills in the treatment of individuals with emotional and behavioral problems. Students learn under the direction of qualified supervisors at an approved site. Case experiences are further analyzed and discussed under the supervision of faculty in weekly class meetings. Students complete a minimum of 100 hours of counseling service, 40 client contact hours, and weekly group and dyadic or triadic supervision hours. Favorable final evaluations by the site supervisor and faculty are required for credit. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: CN 6150, CN 6253, CN 6354, CN 6355, CN 6356, CN 6361, CN 7301, and a total of at least 30 credit hours in counseling. Corequisite: CN 7199.

CN 6361. Abnormal Behavior and Crisis Counseling. 3 Semester Hours.

This course will focus on the fundamental concepts and theories of crisis counseling and crisis management within mental health agencies. The developmental impact of crises/trauma including the neurobiology of trauma will be explored and special attention will be paid to ecosystemic and multicultural considerations related to crises intervention and prevention strategies. Students will be exposed to a variety of crises situations including disasters, grief, substance abuse, and suicide and to the current intervention and diagnostic methodologies used in their respective contexts.

CN 6363. Special Issues in Substance Abuse. 3 Semester Hours.

Seminars to explore topics related to drug and alcohol abuse, selected according to student's needs and interests.

CN 6364. Substance Use and Addictive Disorders. 3 Semester Hours.

This course will examine how substance abuse and addictive disorders affect individuals, family members, couples, and significant others as well as how they impact and influence the user. In addition, the models of diagnosis, assessment tools, and methods of intervention for these groups will be identified and discussed. Strategies and behaviors that family members, couples, individuals, and significant others must adopt in order to assist in sustaining recovery and healthy relationships will be outlined.

CN 6369. Introduction to Couples and Family Counseling. 3 Semester Hours.

An overview of the techniques and strategies used in couples and family counseling with special emphasis for students who are not seeking to become a marriage and family therapist.

CN 6381. Methods of Research. 3 Semester Hours.

Methods and tools of research in behavioral sciences. Emphasis on practical application of basic concepts in producing and consuming research. This course covers quantitative and qualitative research methods and basic statistical skills.

CN 7112. Internship Completion. 1 Semester Hour.

This course is taken after a student has registered for both CN 7359 Internship in Counseling I and CN 7360 Internship in Counseling II but has not yet completed all of the experiential hours required in those courses. Students who have fewer than 41 direct client contact hours remaining to complete internship requirements can register for this course. Students are expected to meet with clients and supervisors throughout the semester when enrolled in an Internship Completion course.

CN 7187. Expressive Modalities of Play Therapy. 1 Semester Hour.

Course provides overview of expressive modalities utilized within play therapy, including art therapy, music therapy, and the use of sand in therapy. Students will understand the theoretical justification for implementing and interpreting expressive modalities in therapy with children and adolescents. Extension of these modalities to adult counseling, including couple and family counseling, will also be included.

CN 7188. Family Play Therapy. 1 Semester Hour.

Course provides overview of play-based family assessment and intervention and its application to diverse client populations. Traditional involvement of parents in play therapy is reviewed and expanded in the contexts of family systems theory and attachment theory. Theoretical and empirical examination of the effects of parent-child play interactions on child development is also referenced.

CN 7189. Special Topics in Play Therapy. 1 Semester Hour.

The course is offered in order to introduce students to emerging theory and techniques within the play therapy field. The application of play therapy models and techniques to special populations will also be addressed. Examples of topics: Advanced Child-Centered Play Therapy Techniques; Play Therapy with Children diagnosed with Oppositional-Defiant Disorder; Play Therapy with Children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders; Advanced Adlerian Play Therapy Techniques; Advanced Experiential Play Therapy Techniques; Play Therapy with Physically, Emotionally, and Sexually Abused Children; Play-Based Child and Family Assessment Techniques.

CN 7190. Field Experience in Play Therapy. 1 Semester Hour.

Within this course, students will be engaged in supervised play therapy clinical experience, receiving clinical supervision from a registered play therapy supervisor (RPT-S). Students can enroll simultaneously in this course and practicum or internship.

CN 7199. Clinical Mental Health Capstone Course. 1 Semester Hour.

This course is designed to assess students' overall professional knowledge, clinical skills and practices, and multicultural and advocacy competencies in their work with individuals, families, groups and/or communities. Under the supervision of the students' faculty advisor, students will demonstrate their ability to conceptualize cases; utilize diagnoses (or not); create treatment plans; assess client/familial progress; work with other mental health professionals in an interdisciplinary context; determine when to refer for an evaluation for psychotropic mediations; understand the usage of such medications, their side effects, and how to consult with a client's respective medication provider; monitor and assess the impact of traumatic events; and terminate therapeutic relationships. Students will also be required to assess their strengths and weaknesses and develop plans for continued professional development and long-term self care. Corequisite: CN 6357.

CN 7212. Internship Completion. 2 Semester Hours.

This course is taken after a student has registered for both CN 7359 Internship in Counseling I and CN 7360 Internship in Counseling II but has not yet completed all of the experiential hours required in those courses. Students who have between 41 and 80 direct client contact hours remaining to complete internship requirements can register for this course. Students are expected to meet with clients and supervisors throughout the semester when enrolled in an Internship Completion course.

CN 7230. Consultation. 2 Semester Hours.

Theoretical rationale for consultation; content and process of consultation services. Basic principles of and skill development in several approaches to consultation.

CN 7262. Cognitive Approaches to Counseling. 2 Semester Hours.

Theoretical foundations of and skill development in therapeutic approaches based on trait factor and cognitive theories including Rational Emotive Therapy, Reality Therapy and Decision Making Strategies. Prerequisite: CN 6355.

CN 7263. Behavioral Approaches to Counseling. 2 Semester Hours.

Theoretical foundations of and skill development in therapeutic approaches based on social learning theory including Behavior Modification and Contingency Management. Prerequisite: CN 6355.

CN 7264. Psychopharmacology. 2 Semester Hours.

An overview of psychotropic drugs; their clinical implications, side effects, and relation to counseling.

CN 7268. Relational Approaches to Counseling. 2 Semester Hours.

Theoretical foundation of and skill development in therapeutic approaches based on Self-in-Relation Theory. Prerequisites: CN 6355 or doctoral student standing.

CN 7276. Perceptual-Affective Approaches to Counseling. 2 Semester Hours.

Theoretical foundations of and skill development in therapeutic approaches based on self-theory and phenomenological psychology including Client Centered Counseling, Gestalt Therapy, and Existential Counseling. Prerequisite: CN 6355.

CN 7286. Psychodynamic Approaches to Counseling. 2 Semester Hours.

Theoretical foundations of and skill development in therapeutic approaches based on self-theory and phenomenological psychology including Client Centered Counseling, Gestalt Therapy, and Existential Counseling. Prerequisite: CN 6355.

CN 7301. Professional and Ethical Issues. 3 Semester Hours.

This course seeks to address problems in professional practice of guidance, counseling, marriage and family therapy, and research. Upon completion of this course, students will have gained further knowledge about professional ethics, relations to other professionals, and the public as well as liability issues in the counseling profession.

CN 7302. Social/Cultural Issues in Counseling. 3 Semester Hours.

The effects of social change, cultural patterns, roles of men and women, different lifestyles, ethnic groups, and other special populations in the counseling process.

CN 7311. Directed Readings & Research. 3 Semester Hours.

Prior permission of instructor and Graduate Program Director needed before authorization for registration.

CN 7312. Internship Completion. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is taken after a student has registered for both CN 7359 Internship in Counseling I and CN 7360 Internship in Counseling II but has not yet completed all of the experiential hours required in those courses. Students who have more than 80 direct client contact hours remaining to complete internship requirements can register for this course. Students are expected to meet with clients and supervisors throughout the semester when enrolled in an Internship Completion course.

CN 7317. Professional Seminar in Rehabilitation Counseling. 3 Semester Hours.

Introductory course integrating theory and practice in the field of rehabilitation counseling. History and philosophy of rehabilitation as a social movement including relevant legislation. Study of institutions and roles, function, and work of the rehabilitation counselor. Analysis and discussion of current and future trends, clinical and professional practice, and research and research utilization in rehabilitation.

CN 7318. Social and Psychological Aspects of Disability. 3 Semester Hours.

Examination of historical and cultural concepts of human deviance and disability. Analysis of social, psychological, family, and vocational factors resulting from severe disability and disadvantaged human conditions. Relationship of rehabilitation to disability and to individual adjustment.

CN 7319. Health Counseling and Medical Aspects of Disability. 3 Semester Hours.

This course will address issues of public health as well as counseling people with chronic and disabling diseases. This course will also provide medical information essential to understanding the functional capacities of individual with disabilities and restoratives techniques. Basic anatomy and physiology will be covered.

CN 7333. Mental Health and Psychopathology. 3 Semester Hours.

Reviews the healthy personality and various models of psychopathology, including the DSM-5 and organic diseases that masquerade as psychological problems and the medications that commonly are used to treat these psychological disorders.

CN 7350. Advanced Clinical Practicum. 3 Semester Hours.

This practicum provides doctoral students a counseling experience prior to the actual internship and requires a minimum of 100 hours of counseling service, 40 client contact hours, and weekly one and a half hours of group supervision and one hour of dyadic or triadic supervision. Prerequisites: doctoral student standing and the completion of any clinical leveling courses.

CN 7351. Human Growth and Development. 3 Semester Hours.

Survey of human growth and development from birth through adolescence, maturity, and older adulthood. Special emphasis on biophysical, cognitive, affective, and psycho-social domains. CN 7359. Internship in Counseling I. 3 Semester Hours.

The internship provides the opportunity to develop skills in the treatment of individuals with emotional and behavioral problems, under the direction of qualified supervisors at an approved site. Case experiences are further analyzed and discussed under the supervision of faculty in weekly class meetings. Students complete a minimum of 300 hours of counseling service, 120 client contact hours, and weekly group and dyadic or triadic supervision. Favorable final evaluations by the site supervisor and faculty are required for credit. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: CN 6150/6253, 6354. 6355, 6356, 6357, 6361, 7301, 7302, 7351, or permission of instructor, and, completion of 30 semester hours in the program, and admission to candidacy for the Master’s degree.

CN 7360. Internship in Counseling II. 3 Semester Hours.

The internship provides the opportunity to develop skills in the treatment of individuals with emotional and behavioral problems, under the direction of qualified supervisors at an approved site. Case experiences are further analyzed and discussed under the supervision of faculty in weekly class meetings. Students complete a minimum of 300 hours of counseling service, 120 client contact hours, and weekly group and dyadic or triadic supervision. Favorable final evaluations by the site supervisor and faculty are required for credit. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: CN 6150/6253, 6354. 6355, 6356, 6357, 6361, 7301, 7302, 7351, or permission of instructor, and, completion of 30 semester hours in the program, and admission to candidacy for the Master’s degree.

CN 7361. Internship in Counseling III. 3 Semester Hours.

The internship provides the opportunity to develop skills in the treatment of individuals with emotional and behavioral problems, under the direction of doctoral qualified supervisors at an approved site. Case experiences are further analyzed and discussed under the supervision of faculty in weekly class meetings. Students complete a minimum of 300 hours on site, 120 client contact hours, and 15 hours of supervision. Favorable final evaluations by the site supervisor and faculty are required for credit. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: CN 6150,CN 6253, CN 6354, CN 6355, CN 6356, CN 6357, CN 6361, CN 7301, CN 7302, and CN 7351,  completion of 30 semester hours in the program, and admission to candidacy for the Master’s degree.

CN 7367. Community Counseling and Social Justice. 3 Semester Hours.

The roles of counselors in community agencies, private practice, in litigation and consulting processes, and in client advocacy will be explored with the intent of assessing means by which counselors can provide access to and delivery of optimal mental health services. Counselors’ roles and responsibilities in promoting fair and equitable mental health policy and legislation in a variety of contexts will be examined. Special attention will be paid to how the confluence of social and political barriers impact counselors’ ability to assess and advocate for individual and community needs, facilitate conflict resolution, and secure resources for programs designed to empower and serve oppressed populations. Such oppressed populations include those individuals dealing with racism, sexism, religious persecution, poverty, immigration issues, language barriers, trauma (i.e. natural disaster, domestic violence etc.), heterosexism, physical disabilities, mental illness and interpersonal and/or institutional rankism.

CN 7368. Relational Approaches to Counseling. 3 Semester Hours.

Theoretical foundation of and skill development in therapeutic approaches based on Self-in-Relation Theory. Prerequisites: CN 6355 or doctoral student standing.

CN 7369. Field Placement Social Justice Practicum. 3 Semester Hours.

The field experience is designed to develop advocacy competencies through participation in social justice efforts, which seek to promote a more equitable distribution of power and resources, so all can live with dignity, self-determination, and safety.

CN 7375. Child Development and Play Therapy. 3 Semester Hours.

Course content examines child development in terms of individual development and development in a relational context, and how child development informs the process of involving child in family counseling. Traditional theories and family social science theories of child development will be compared, and applied knowledge of filial, and child and family play therapies will be emphasized.

CN 7377. Sexuality Counseling and Somatic Issues. 3 Semester Hours.

This class will explore the physiological, psychological, sociological, and theological aspects of human sexuality. Special emphasis will be given to the connection of sexual desire with love and intimacy. This course will include discussion of sexual arousal and response, nature, origin, treatment of sexual difficulties and sexual disorders.

CN 7378. Divorce, Mediation, and Remarriage. 3 Semester Hours.

A study of the issues involved in separation, divorce, and remarriage. Special methodologies applicable for dealing with individuals and families.

CN 7385. Qualitative Research Methodologies. 3 Semester Hours.

This course will explore the practical dimensions of qualitative research, such as creating a research design, conducting interviews and observations, and analyzing qualitative data to include understanding the ethical considerations needed in conducting credible qualitative research. This course will explore the central concepts, issues, and dilemmas associated with qualitative research by analyzing qualitative research studies. Additionally, this course will help students understand the principles and methodologies of a number of paradigms within qualitative research from ethnographies, case studies, phenomenology, grounded theory, content analysis, applied research and critical studies. Prerequisites: CN8381 and CN8382.

CN 7386. Methods & Tech of Play Therapy. 3 Semester Hours. This course is designed to introduce students to the philosophical foundation of play therapy, including a review of the history and evolution of the field as well as an overview of traditional and emerging theoretical models. Students will develop an understanding of a variety of play therapy techniques, application of models and techniques to diverse client populations and diagnostic categories, and ethical issues potentially encountered within play therapy practice.

CN 7399. Thesis Direction. 3 Semester Hours.

The thesis is the culminating experience which provides a record of a student's achievement in the program. The thesis requires research leading to the discovery or new knowledge or enhancement of existing knowledge in the field of interest. A project that helps solve a practical problem may also be acceptable. The thesis is a complete documentation of the research study, including theoretical background, description of the problem, the method used to investigate or solve the problem, presentation of results, interpretation of results, and explanation of the significance of the results.

CN 8118. Neurofeedback Practicum. 1 Semester Hour.

Supervised neurofeedback experience with clients.

CN 8123. Doctoral Seminar in Counseling. 1 Semester Hour.

An analysis of the issues facing the professional practitioner and educator in contemporary society; research and discussion of special topics, plus current and basic issues in preservice and inservice counselor education.

CN 8194. Professional Identity in Counselor Education and Supervision. 1 Semester Hour.

This course provides an experience for doctoral counseling students to advance their professional identity through mentorship and involvement in the profession. Students will explore opportunities for membership and leadership in professional organizations, the process of developing and submitting conference presentation proposals and journal manuscripts, and locating and responding to opportunities for research- and practice-related grants. Students will learn about the common organizational structures in higher education and expectations of faculty members at universities.

CN 8218. Neurofeedback Practicum. 2 Semester Hours.

Supervised neurofeedback experience with clients.

CN 8301. Professional Writing in Counseling. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is designed to help become effective, efficient, and successful writers in counseling and related disciplines. Students will be able to demonstrate effective writing skills to non-professional and professional audiences. Written work is evaluated on general publishing standards in a portfolio of selected works, specific to the student's area and expertise. There will also be a focus on the protocols for writing the dissertation. Prerequisite: Doctoral student standing.

CN 8309. Theory and Practice of University Teaching. 3 Semester Hours.

Through readings, class discussions, presentations, and teaching experiences, students will explore the major roles, responsibilities, and activities of graduate mental health program educators. Students will learn about instructional theory and methods relevant preparing mental health professionals. Ethical, legal, multicultural, and accreditation issues associated with training mental health professionals will be examined. Students will develop their personal philosophies of teaching and learning and will begin developing a teaching portfolio. During the application portion of this course, students will demonstrate use of their teaching and learning philosophies, effective course design, varied course delivery methods (including both face-to-face and online delivery techniques), and application of evaluation methods that are appropriate to course objectives. Students also will demonstrate their abilities to assess the needs of students and develop techniques to help students develop into competent mental health professionals.

CN 8314. Supervision Internship. 3 Semester Hours.

Field based supervision of counselors-in-training. Prerequisite: CN 8324.

CN 8317. Theory & Practice of Neurofeedback. 3 Semester Hours.

This course covers the theory behind the use of neurofeedback to treat psychological disorders and improve performance and functioning. Students are introduced to procedures used to assess neurofeedback needs and perform neurofeedback with clients.

CN 8318. Neurofeedback Practicum. 3 Semester Hours.

Supervised neurofeedback experience with clients.

CN 8324. Process of Supervision in Counselor Education. 3 Semester Hours.

A study of models of supervision, including an overview of their relationship to counselor development. Supervision best practices and ethics also are discussed. Prerequisite: 600 hours of supervised clinical experience.

CN 8341. Advanced Multicultural Assessment. 3 Semester Hours.

This course focuses on objective measures of personality that will be maximally useful for professional counselors in developing treatment plans for individual and group counseling. Featured assessment instruments may include the California Psychological Inventory, the FIRO-B, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator-Expanded Analysis Report, the Family Environment Scale and the 16 PF. Tests for evaluating learning styles, study skills, and motivation are also included. Laboratory fee $25.00.

CN 8350. Philosophical Foundations of Counseling. 3 Semester Hours.

Explores presuppositions of psychotherapy via analysis of existence and intentionality and inquiries into cognition and epistemology. Relates basic norms of authentic practice to the intellectual, moral, and religious conversions of the therapist. Locates the ground of professional practice in the self-transcending intentionality of the existential subject. Relates the common sense, theoretical, transcendent, and methodological realms of meaning.

CN 8355. Advanced Theories of Counseling. 3 Semester Hours.

An examination of the various theories of counseling and the implications for the practicing counselor; specific attention is focused on selected aspects of different theories with consideration of similarities and differences. Prerequisites: CN 6355 and permission of department faculty or doctoral student standing.

CN 8359. Doctoral Internship I. 3 Semester Hours.

The Doctoral Internship is a two-semester experience designed to give doctoral students counselor education experiences that they are lacking. Doctoral students plan their internship experiences under the direction of their academic advisors in order to gain experience in counselor education areas where they are lacking. Internship experiences can include counseling, counseling leadership, teaching, research, supervision, administration, or other activities related to counselor education. During each semester, interns complete at least 300 hours of experience and attend weekly group and dyadic or triadic supervision. Favorable evaluations by all supervisors are required for credit.

CN 8360. Doctoral Internship II. 3 Semester Hours.

The Doctoral Internship is a two-semester experience designed to give doctoral students counselor education experiences that they are lacking. Doctoral students plan their internship experiences under the direction of their academic advisors in order to gain experience in counselor education areas where they are lacking. Internship experiences can include counseling, counseling leadership, teaching, research, supervision, administration, or other activities related to counselor education. During each semester, interns complete at least 300 hours of experience and attend weekly group and dyadic or triadic supervision. Favorable evaluations by all supervisors are required for credit.

CN 8361. Doctoral Internship III. 3 Semester Hours.

Doctoral students have the option of obtaining experience beyond Doctoral Internship II as an elective. Those who take a third internship plan their internship experiences under the direction of their academic advisors in order to gain experience in counselor education areas where they are lacking. Internship experiences can include counseling, counseling leadership, teaching, research, supervision, administration, or other activities related to counselor education. During each semester, interns complete at least 300 hours of experience and attend weekly group and dyadic or triadic supervision. Favorable evaluations by all supervisors are required for credit.

CN 8373. Gender and Ethnicity Through the Life Cycle. 3 Semester Hours.

Theoretical and clinical concerns related to family development and its interactions with issues of gender, ethnicity, aging, ADS, chronic illness, disability, sexual diversity, and multiculturalism. Family life cycle development theory and issues and concerns of each stage will be explored to develop an awareness and understanding of how traditional family life cycle theory is changed in respect to the topics mentioned above. How these issues affect therapy with individuals, couples, and/or families will be a focus.

CN 8375. Working With Latino Families. 3 Semester Hours.

Students in this course cover theory and research covering the cultural variety, value orientations, relational emphases, and clinical priorities and outcomes for Latino families in the U.S. Emphasis will be placed on cultural nuances affecting presentation, assessment, and treatment of Latino individuals, couples, and families, as well as program development in Latino communities.

CN 8377. Qualitative Research. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is a seminar course for doctoral students interested in developing a research proposal based on qualitative research methods. Through assigned readings and class discussions, this course will examine the philosophical, theoretical and practices of qualitative research methodologies with specific focus on phenomenological and grounded theory. Guest speakers will demonstrate the qualitative methodology utilized in their published work, with particular emphasis on analytical strategies and preparing findings for final write up. Students will be exposed to and practice the use of qualitative software. Students will complete a qualitative research proposal in meeting the course objectives. Prerequisites: CN 8381CN 8382, and CN 7385.

CN 8380. Statistical Assessment. 3 Semester Hours.

The primary goal of this course is to provide the student with a foundation ranging from descriptive statistics to basic inferential statistics.

CN 8381. Advanced Research I. 3 Semester Hours.

This is the first of a two-course sequence, intended to provide students with advanced statistical and research skills to design, interpret, and develop counseling and psychological research.

CN 8382. Advanced Research II. 3 Semester Hours.

This is the second of a two-course sequence, intended to provide students with advanced statistical and research skills to design, interpret, and develop counseling and psychological research.

CN 8385. Advanced Statistics. 3 Semester Hours.

The primary goal of this course is to develop foundational skills for a range of statistical procedures and programs, from basic inferential statistics to the introduction of multivariate data.

CN 8390. Dissertation Research. 3 Semester Hours.

To be scheduled only with consent of department.

CN 8391. Dissertation Proposal. 3 Semester Hours.

To be scheduled only with consent of department after passing the qualifying examination  Students enrolled in Dissertation Proposal work on their dissertation proposal.

CN 8392. Dissertation Defense. 3 Semester Hours.

To be scheduled only with consent of department after approval of the proposal.  Students enrolled in Dissertation Defense work on collecting data, completing their dissertation, and defending their dissertation.

CN 8393. Leadership, Advocacy & Service. 3 Semester Hours.

Through readings, class discussions, presentations, and teaching experiences, students will explore the concepts of leadership, advocacy, and service in the counseling profession. Ethical, legal, multicultural, and accreditation issues associated with mental health professionals will be examined. Students will identify and develop personal plans to include acknowledgement of leadership style. Additionally, students will begin the work of finding their voice as a professional advocate as well as develop a comprehensive service program to the community.

 

Dana Comstock, Ph.D.
Professor

Demetrius Donseroux, Ph.D.
Visiting Instructor

Melanie Harper, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Romulo Montilla, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Dan Ratliff, Ph.D.
Professor

Carolyn Tubbs, Ph.D.
Associate Professor