Chemistry and Biochemistry

School

School of Science, Engineering and Technology

School Dean

Winston F. Erevelles, Ph.D.

Department

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Department Chair

Susan Oxley, Ph.D.

The Chemistry and Biochemistry majors at St. Mary's University provide excellent preparation for graduate school, professional school, or entering a career in industry. The degree programs offered include:

  • B.A. in Chemistry
  • B.S. in Chemistry
  • B.A. in Chemistry with Secondary Teaching Certification
  • B.S. in Biochemistry
  • B.S. in Forensic Science - Chemistry Option

Our programs place a strong emphasis on critical problem solving. Students learn to work as part of a laboratory team yet also develop the ability to work independently. The Chemistry and Biochemistry programs promote versatility and prepare students for a wide range of options after graduation. The programs stress not only the fundamentals of chemistry, but the development of the intellectual skills necessary to apply them. The department offers small class sizes, close interaction with the faculty and a variety of tutoring options.

Forensic Science

St. Mary's newest major, forensic science is an exciting field and one of the country's fastest growing job markets. Solving crime requires knowledge of biological, chemical, physiological, social and individual factors. St. Mary's program integrates biological science, social science and professional preparation so students are uniquely prepared for this cutting edge area of study.

Forensic science is the application of science to the law. It relies on the physical and behavioral sciences for investigating and solving crimes and examining physical trace evidence. The School's forensic science degree with a chemistry or biology option emphasizes the integration of academic preparation and real world problem solving with a focus on ethical and professional commitment.

Minor in Chemistry

All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course

CH 1303. Preparatory Chemistry. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is designed for students with inadequate background for CH1401. Manipulative skills and basic concepts requiring problem solving will be stressed. Not accepted in lieu of CH1401, CH1402. This course satisfies the general education requirement.

CH 1304. Chem Concepts & Applications. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is designed for the non-science major as part of one's general education. Chemistry is a fundamental science, some of its basic concepts will be developed as well as some of its applications to every day life. No prerequisites.

CH 1401. General Chemistry I. 4 Semester Hours.

Fundamentals of chemistry for scientists and engineers; the first semester is an introduction to chemical reactivity, aqueous solution chemistry, chemical calculations, the states of matter, thermo chemistry and molecular structure and boding. Prerequisite: MT1411, or permission of Chemistry Department Chair. (Fall; Spring; Summer) (Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 4 hours).

CH 1402. General Chemistry II. 4 Semester Hours.

Fundamentals of chemistry for scientists and engineers; this second semester of general chemistry is an introduction to chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, aqueous acids and bases, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: CH 1401. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Fall; Spring; Summer) (Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 4 hours).

CH 1404. Intro to Organic & Biochemistry. 4 Semester Hours.

This course is designed to provide a general overview of these two specific areas of chemistry for non- majors. It will provide the general basics of organic chemistry including basic carbon chemistry, nomenclature, structures of organic compounds, chemical characteristics and function,reactions, and mechanisms. This will provide the background necessary to study the concepts of organic chemistry that apply to the structure and function of biological macro molecules. Topics in this course will cover the main biological macro molecules of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids, and their role in cellular metabolism, states of disease, and drug applications. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts needed to pursue studies in related professional fields. Prerequisite: CH 1401. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lec ture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours.).

CH 3411. Organic Chemistry I. 4 Semester Hours.

The study of the compounds of carbon. The major functional groups are examined on their basis of the physical and chemical properties. Fundamental theories of bonding, structures, mechanisms, synthesis, and spectros copy are topics covered in the organic chemistry curriculum. (Fall only) Prerequisite: CH1402 (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours.).

CH 3412. Organic Chemistry II. 4 Semester Hours.

The study of the compounds of carbon. The major functional groups are examined on their basis of the physical and chemical properties. Fundamental theories of bonding, structures, mechanisms, synthesis, and spectros copy are topics covered in the organic chemistry curriculum. (Spring only) Prerequisite: CH3411 (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.)(Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours.).

CH 3423. Analytical Chemistry. 4 Semester Hours.

An introduction to traditional methods of chemical analysis, i.e. "wet" chemistry. Emphasis is on lab performance. Experiments cover volumetric, gravimetric colorimetric, potentiometric, and other techniques. Prerequisites: CH1402 (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Fall; Spring) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

CH 3424. Instrumental Analysis. 4 Semester Hours.

An introduction to chemical analysis via instrumentation. Emphasis is on lab performance. Instruments are spectroscopic and chromographic. (Spring only) Prerequisite: CH3423 (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

CH 3433. Physical Chemistry I. 4 Semester Hours.

This is an introduction for chemistry and biochemistry students to chemical thermodynamics, classical statistical mechanics, chemical kinetics, and transport properties with a writing intensive laboratory. (Fall only) Prerequisites: CH1402, MT2413, PY1402 or PY2404. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

CH 3434. Intermediate Physical Chemistry. 4 Semester Hours.

An introduction to chemical analysis via instrumentation. Emphasis is on lab performance. Instruments are spectro scopic and chromographic. (Spring only) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

CH 3440. Toxicology. 4 Semester Hours.

CH 4100. Seminar in Chemistry. 1 Semester Hour.

Presentation and discussion of current research in the field of chemistry. (May be repeated for a maximum of 2 semester hours.) Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

CH 4125. Chemical Reseach. 1 Semester Hour.

Practical literature and laboratory experience with an original problem in chemical research. (May be repeated for a maximum of 4 semester hours.) Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.

CH 4150. Spec. Topics Chemistry/Biochem. 1 Semester Hour.

This advanced course introduces a field of chemistry that is of current interest in the chemistry community of today. Examples of possible topics are material sciences, polymer chemistry, chemical separations, and chemical spectroscopy. This course may be repeated only if the current topic is different from any previous enrollment of that student. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

CH 4225. Chemical Research. 2 Semester Hours.

Practical literature and laboratory experience with an original problem in chemical research. (May be repeated for a maximum of 4 semester hours.) Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.

CH 4250. Spec. Topics Chemistry/Biochem. 2 Semester Hours.

This advanced course introduces a field of chemistry that is of current interest in the chemistry community of today. Examples of possible topics are material sciences, polymer chemistry, chemical separations, and chemical spectroscopy. This course may be repeated only if the current topic is different from any previous enrollment of that student. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

CH 4310. Intermediate Organic Chemistry. 3 Semester Hours.

This course presents advanced theory and current topics in organic chemistry which build on and expand on those covered in Organic Chemistry I and II, including stereochemistry, molecular orbital theory, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis. Emphasis is made on theoretical and empirical generalizations including organic reaction mechanisms and modern methods of organic synthesis. Prerequisite: CH3412 (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

CH 4325. Chemical Research. 3 Semester Hours.

Practical literature and laboratory experience with an original problem in chemical research. (May be repeated for a maximum of 4 semester hours.) Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.

CH 4330. Chemical Thermodynamics. 3 Semester Hours.

An introduction to statistical thermodynamics and its application to chemistry and biochemistry. The course may conclude with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Prerequisites: CH3433 and CH3434. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

CH 4340. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Semester Hours.

A study of molecular symmetry, structure and bonding, inorganic solid state chemistry, solution chemistry, chemistry of the representative elements, transition metal chemistry, and organometallic chemistry. Prerequisite: CH 3412. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

CH 4350. Spec. Topics Chemistry/Biochem. 3 Semester Hours.

This advanced course introduces a field of chemistry that is of current interest in the chemistry community of today. Examples of possible topics are material sciences, polymer chemistry, chemical separations, and chemical spectroscopy. This course may be repeated only if the current topic is different from any previous enrollment of that student. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

CH 4353. Biochem of Specialized Tissues. 3 Semester Hours.

Biomolecular aspects of the structure and controlled functioning of specialized systems in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, highlighted by studies of the sensory and immune systems, muscle contraction/mobility and membrane transport phenomena. Prerequisites: CH/BL4451 or concurrent registration. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

CH 4354. Biochemistry of the Hormones. 3 Semester Hours.

The biochemical basis of normal versus abnormal functioning of the hormonal control mechanisms in mammalian systems; this will include a detailed discussion of molecular mechanisms for hormonal control of the path ways of intermediary metabolism and of the absence/aberration of such regulatory processes evidenced in metabolic disease. Prerequisites: CH/BL4452 or concurrent registration. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

CH 4355. Immunochemistry. 3 Semester Hours.

The molecular basis of the normal operation of the vertebrate immune system and studies of aberrations of immune mechanisms in disease processes. The latter is exemplified by the biomolecular aspects of infectious diseases (caused by pathogenic microorganisms) autoimmune disorders, tissue damage, and cancer. Prerequisites: CH/BL 4451 or concurrent registration. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

CH 4356. Enzyme Chemistry. 3 Semester Hours.

The molecular architecture of enzymes and the dynamics of enzyme mediated catalysis. Topics include a classification of enzyme systems, enzyme kinetics, mechanisms of enzyme action and the regulation of the activity of enzymes. Prerequisites: CH/BL 4451. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

CH 4440. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 4 Semester Hours.

The course will start with the fundamentals of chemistry, molecular symmetry, molecular structure and bonding. Followed by an introduction to solid-state chemistry, chemistry of representative elements, transition metal chemistry and organometalllic chemistry. Prerequisites: CH1402, CH3433, CH3434. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

CH 4451. Biochemistry I. 4 Semester Hours.

Study of the processes of life at the molecular level. The physiochemical properties of the biologically important molecules and macromolecules is presented with the goal of understanding their structure vs. biological activity relationships. Major topics include the study of enzymes, metabolism, bioenergetics, and regulation of biochemical processes, membranes and molecular genetics. (Fall only) Prerequisites: CH 3411, CH 3412 (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

CH 4452. Biochemistry II. 4 Semester Hours.

Study of the processes of life at the molecular level. The physiochemical properties of the biologically important molecules and macromolecules is presented with the goal of understanding their structure vs. biological activity relationships. Major topics include the study of enzymes, metabolism, bioenergetics, and regulation of biochemical processes, membranes and molecular genetics. (Spring only) Prerequisites: CH 4451 (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

Pius Adelani, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

George Anquandah, Ph.D.
Instructor

Xinghai Chen, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

Dmitriy Khon, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Michael Losiewicz, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Susan Oxley, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Timothy Pieprzyca, M.S.
Instructor

Jeff Schoonover, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

Jose Tormos Melendez, Ph.D.
Associate Professor