Biology

School

School of Science, Engineering and Technology

School Dean

Winston F. Erevelles, Ph.D.

Department

Biological Sciences

Department Chair

Timothy Raabe, Ph.D.

Students who aspire to the health professions pursue a curriculum devoted almost exclusively to the natural sciences in search of technical expertise. The programs in the Department of Biological Sciences lead to the B.A. or B.S. degree and prepare students for employment or additional studies in professional or graduate school. Students earning a B.S. degree are automatically working on a minor in chemistry. The B.S. in Forensic Science (Biology Option) is a rigorous major covering both the science and law aspects of this prominently expanding scientific field. Students completing this degree will be adequately prepared to obtain employment at a Forensic Crime laboratory, to pursue graduate studies in a number of specialties within the field, or to enter a variety of professional schools. The B.A. degree with teacher certification satisfies the requirements for teacher certification by the Texas State Board for Educator Certification.

The study of biological sciences at St. Mary's University includes a broad-based curriculum and extensive scientific training designed to prepare well-rounded health care professionals. Students develop written and oral communication skills, critical thinking and analytical skills, and an understanding and respect for ethical and moral concerns. The first two years of the program are a common set of courses in general biology followed by genetic principles and cell biology. Following completion of the first two years of study, students enroll in a total of four advanced biology electives which can include anatomy, general physiology, microbiology, transmission genetics, comparative anatomy, neurophysiology, comparative physiology, genes & genomes, developmental biology, immunology, medical microbiology or molecular biology. The final year includes a two-semester biochemistry course. All of the biology courses required for the major have a laboratory component that are meant to develop hands-on learning experiences.

Because our students display competence, dedication and compassion, they are readily accepted into graduate programs, the health professions, biomedical research and teaching fields. The program in biological sciences is built upon a rigorous study of biology and includes courses in chemistry, physics and mathematics that satisfy professional school entrance requirements.

Health Profession Partnerships

  • Dental Early Admission Program (DEAP)
  • Joint Admission Medical Program (JAMP)
  • Health Professions Early Acceptance Program (HEAP)
  • Nursing Early Acceptance Program (NEAP)

Forensic Science Major

Forensic Science is an exciting field and one of the country's fastest growing job markets. Solving crime requires knowledge of biological, chemical, physiological, social and individual factors. St. Mary's program integrates biological science, social science and professional preparation so students are uniquely prepared for this cutting edge area of study.

Forensic science is the application of science to the law. It relies on the physical and behavioral sciences for investigating and solving crimes and examining physical trace evidence. The School's forensic science degree with a chemistry or biology option emphasizes the integration of academic preparation and real world problem solving with a focus on ethical and professional commitment.

Minor in Biology

All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.

BL 1301. General Biology for Non-Majors. 3 Semester Hours.

Designed for non-biology majors to fulfill natural science requirement. Cannot be applied to Biology major or minor requirement. An introduction to the science of biology providing general principles, organization and diversity of life, maintenance and perpetuation of life forms, and interrelationships between living things. Emphasis on human concerns. No prerequisite for BL 1301 or BL 1302. (Lecture 2 hours, Lab 3 hours.).

BL 1302. General Biology for Non-Majors. 3 Semester Hours.

Designed for non-biology majors to fulfill natural science requirement. Cannot be applied to Biology major or minor requirement. An introduction to the science of biology providing general principles, organization and diversity of life, maintenance and perpetuation of life forms, and interrelationships between living things. Emphasis on human concerns. No prerequisite for BL 1301 or BL 1302. (Lecture 2 hours, Lab 3 hours.).

BL 1401. General Biology for Majors I. 4 Semester Hours.

First part of a comprehensive and rigorous two semester introduction to modern biological science, providing the foundation for the biology major. Unifying principles, the cell, organization and diversity of life, evolution, ecology, molecular biology, metabolism, general physiology, reproduction, and development. Successful completion required for enrollment in BL 1402. (Lecture 3 hours, Lab 4 hours.) This is a writing intensive course.

BL 1402. General Biology for Majors II. 4 Semester Hours.

Second part of a comprehensive and rigorous two semester introduction to modern biological science, providing the foundation for the biology major. Unifying principles, the cell, organization and diversity of life, evolution, ecology, molecular biology, metabolism, general physiology, reproduction, and development. Successful completion required for enrollment in BL 2330, BL 2332, and BL 2233L. Prerequisite: BL 1401. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) This is a writing intensive course.(Lecture 3 hours, Lab 4 hours.).

BL 2233. Cell & Molecular Methods. 2 Semester Hours.

Laboratory projects emphasize experimental approaches to cellular and molecular biology, including growth of bacteria and animal cells, analysis and purification of DNA and protein, light and fluorescence microscopy, digital video microscopy and quantitative image analysis. Other topics include DNA and protein database searches, conducting scientific literature searches and generating hypotheses for original research and scientific report writing. Prerequisites: Concurrent registration in BL 2330 or BL 2332. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lab 4 hours).

BL 2330. Genetic Principles. 3 Semester Hours.

Integrates classic Mendelian principles into a modern molecular genetic perspective. The chromosomal basis of inheritance, gene linkage, chromosome recombination and mapping, DNA structure and function, the genetic code, mutation, gene regulation, transcription, protein synthesis, bacterial and viral genetics, and the methods and uses of genetic engineering in studying genes, are some of the topics developed through a problem-solving approach. Includes one problem-solving session each week. Prerequisites: BL 1401, BL 1402, CH 1401, & CH 1402. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours).

BL 2332. Cell Biology. 3 Semester Hours.

A study of the organization, function, and assembly of eukaryotic cell components, including proteins, membranes, membranous organelles and nuclear organization. Other topics emphasized will be control of gene expression and transcription, protein synthesis, metabolism, endocytosis, signal transduction, cytoskeletal dynamics, cell motility, the cell cycle and apoptosis. Prerequisites: BL 1401, BL 1402, CH 1401, & CH 1402. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; problem-solving session 1 hour).

BL 3000. MCAT Preparation. 0 Semester Hours.

In a partnership with Kaplan, this course will assist students in their preparation for the entrance exam required by medical schools. The Kaplan MCAT Course begins with a comprehensive work-up that includes a Personal Profile and two Diagnostic Tests. This information is utilized to provide comprehensive feedback that will not only identify the student's academic strengths and weaknesses, but also prescribe a study regimen that is tailored to build up the student's knowledge in weak subject areas, reinforce his knowledge in stronger areas and develop the higher order analytical thinking and problem solving skills necessary for success on the MCAT test.

BL 3002. DAT Preparation. 0 Semester Hours.

This is an intensive and comprehensive DAT preparation course provided in conjunction with Kaplan. This course will provide diagnostic testing, preparation for all areas of the DAT exam, and full-length practice DAT exams as part of the course. This is a non-credit course which means that it will not be applied toward any existing degree requirements and will be assigned a grade of pass/no pass. Prerequisites: Must have completed between 60-90 semester hours and must obtain Pre-Health Professions advisor and Department Chair approval to register.

BL 3125. Seminars in Biological Science. 1 Semester Hour.

A series of weekly seminars on current research topics in Biological Sciences. Invited speakers are drawn from the scientific research community in San Antonio and across the nation. Students write a review article on a current biomedical research topic. Cannot be used to fulfill Biology minor or major requirements. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L or permission of the MARC Program Director. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

BL 3130. Scientific Methodology & Analysis. 1 Semester Hour.

The student is introduced to the processes of analyzing and interpreting scientific literature. Course objectives are: 1) to increase the ability to analyze and interpret scientific articles; 2) to effectively use scientific journals; 3) to improve technical writing skills; 4) to understand various research methods; 4) to improve data analysis; 5) to develop and analyze hypotheses. Topics vary with the semester. Cannot be used to fulfill Biology minor or major requirements. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L or permission of MARC Program Director. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

BL 3141. Medical Terminology. 1 Semester Hour.

A course to teach an understanding of the specialized language of medicine designed for forensics majors and as an elective for future health care professionals. Topics to be covered will include the Latin and Greek origins of modern medical terms, acquisition of a vocabulary of root words and standard prefixes and suffixes, terms of pathophysiology, and development of an understanding of the traditional system of descriptive terms and eponyms. Students will learn to translate medical jargon to plain English and also to convert standard speech to appropriate medical vocabulary. Prerequisites: BL 1401 & BL 1402 (Lecture 1 hour) (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

BL 3300. Special Topics in Biology. 3 Semester Hours.

Topics vary from semester to semester. May be retaken for additional credit when a different topic is offered. Prerequisites: BL 1401 and BL 1402. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

BL 3311. Food & Nutrition I. 3 Semester Hours.

Designed for non-biology majors, to fulfill the natural science requirement. Cannot be applied to Biology major or minor requirement. Principles of digestion, absorption, and energy; metabolism of essential nutrients and their sources, requirements and functions in human nutrition. Food selection to meet family needs, clinical point of view on nutritional deficiency and related problems. No prerequisite for BL 3311. BL 3311 is prerequisite for BL 3312. (Lecture 3 hours.).

BL 3312. Food & Nutrition II. 3 Semester Hours.

Designed for non-biology majors, to fulfill the natural science requirement. Cannot be applied to Biology major or minor requirement. Principles of digestion, absorption, and energy; metabolism of essential nutrients and their sources, requirements and functions in human nutrition. Food selection to meet family needs, clinical point of view on nutritional deficiency and related problems. Prerequisite: BL 3311 (Lecture 3 hours). (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

BL 3330. Perceptorship in the Health Professions. 3 Semester Hours.

This course will pair pre-medical/pre-dental students with practicing physicians/dentists in a mentor/mentee relationship. Students will shadow in a medical/dental practice as well as complete academic coursework relating to practice such as readings, reflections, assessments, workshops, seminar discussions, and networking.

BL 3400. Special Topics in Biology. 4 Semester Hours.

Topics vary from semester to semester. May be retaken for additional credit when a different topic is offered. Prerequisites: BL 1401 and BL 1402. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

BL 3420. Anatomy. 4 Semester Hours.

Fundamentals of mammalian structure and form, illustrated by organ systems. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (Lecture 3 hours, Lab 4 hours.).

BL 3422. Embryology. 4 Semester Hours.

Fundamentals of vertebrate embryological development with emphasis on mam- malian and especially human development. This course also includes selected topics in human teratology. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233. (Lecture 3 hours, Lab 4 hours.) (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

BL 3424. Comparative Anatomy. 4 Semester Hours.

A comparative survey of the anatomy of vertebrates in an evolutionary context. All of the major anatomical systems are examined including the skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, and urogenital systems. A large component of this course is the laboratory section, which is dissection-intensive. Additional lecture topics covered include evolution, phylogenetic systematics, and evolutionary development (evo-devo). Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 3430. General Physiology. 4 Semester Hours.

A study of the fundamental mechanisms which regulate the bodies of all animals. The study includes the normal functions of organs and systems, such as transport, respiratory, digestive, excretory, neural, reproductive and hormonal systems. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 3432. Endocrinology. 4 Semester Hours.

A study of the physiological mechanisms of endocrine function. Topics to be covered will include the molecular structure of hormones, cellular mechanisms of production and response to hormones, neuroendocrinology, and the coordination of bodily function via endocrine factors. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 3434. Comparative Physiology. 4 Semester Hours.

Study of the evolution and adaptation of physiological systems in all types of animals including vertebrates and invertebrates. Topics will include physiological processes such as: digestion, metabolism, thermoregulation, locomotion, circulation, osmoregulation, excretion, reproduction, and sensory systems. Emphasis will be placed upon the comparative aspects of physiological systems and upon physiological ecology (the study of physiological adaptations to specific environments) and evolutionary physiology (the study of how physiological traits change over time). This is a writing intensive course. Laboratory activities will enhance skills in experimental design and biostatistics, and teach fundamental techniques in respirometry, thermobiology, ecophysics, bioenergetics, and animal behavior. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.)(Lecture 3 hours, Lab 4 hours).

BL 3436. Neurophysiology. 4 Semester Hours.

This course will investigate the functioning of the nervous system at the cellular and subcellular level. Topics to be discussed in lecture include: glial cell function; ionic mechanisms underlying electrical activity in nerve cells; the physiology of synapses; transduction and integration of sensory information; the analysis of nerve circuits; the specification of neuronal connections; trophic and plastic properties of nerve cells; and the elation of neurnal activity to behavior. The laboratory will incorporate modern neurobiological/neurophysiological techniques including: extracellular recording of action potentials; cell culture of nervous tissue; SDS- PAGE; immunoblotting; immunofluoresence microscopy; and cryo sectioning and staining of nervous tissue. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 3440. Toxicology. 4 Semester Hours.

This course will examine the general principles underlying the effects of toxic substances on biological systems, including consideration of the history, scope and applications of toxicology, toxicant exposure, the mechanisms of toxic action, the disposition of toxicants, the mechanisms of biotransformation of xenobiotics, toxicokinetics and major types of toxicants. In addition, the effects of toxicants on specific organ systems and the underlying mechanisms will be examined. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 3442. Forensic Osteology. 4 Semester Hours.

An examination of the human skeleton as it pertains to forensic science. Topics to be covered include introductory skeletal anatomy, pathology and biology of bone, and basic forensic techniques related to skeletal remains. The laboratory section will teach identification of isolated and fragmentary skeletal elements, and recognition of human skeletal elements versus skeletal remains from non-human vertebrates. Techniques for determining approximate age, gender, stature, and identifying different types of trauma to skeletal remains will be taught. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 3444. Histology. 4 Semester Hours.

This course follows a cellular and differentiative approach aimed at understanding the microstructure and function of various animal tissues, organs and systems. Lectures are complemented by laboratory exercises and laboratory discussion designed to provide students with the skills necessary to study and analyze and correctly identify cells and tissues. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 3450. Adv. Nutrition & Metabolism. 4 Semester Hours.

This course emphasizes a biochemical and clinical approach to studying nutrient utilization. It is designed to foster quantitative and critical thinking skills by de- veloping an understanding of biochemical pathways; conditions and diseases that result from abnormalities in these pathways; and applications of nutrition knowl- edge in preventative medicine. Alternative and integrative approaches to disease prevention also are included. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233.

BL 3461. Transmission Genetics. 4 Semester Hours.

Fundamental principles of Mendelian genetics. Emphasis on genetics research and problem-solving. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 3464. Evolutionary Biology. 4 Semester Hours.

Evolution is foundational to modern biological thought. Students will begin by examining physical, geological and biological evidence for the process of evolution and the historical foundations of evolutionary theory. They will continue to develop their understanding of the mechanisms of evolution using population genetics as a means to objectively observe evolutionary change. Students will then explore topics such as speciation, mass extinction, adaptive radiation, molecular evolution, systematics, disease, conservation biology and evo- devo. The laboratory will include hands-on experimental activities, computer simulations and discussion of primary literature. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 3472. Immunology. 4 Semester Hours.

The course will provide students with a strong foundation in the theory and techniques of modern immunology. The main emphasis of the course will be the role of the human immune system in defense against microbial pathogens. Some of the areas to be studied in-depth include innate immunity, cellular interactions in the immune responses, antigen capture and presentation, antibodies and humoral immunity, cell mediated immunity, self and non-self discrimination, immunization and immune disorders. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 3481. Microbiology. 4 Semester Hours.

Students should obtain a strong understanding of modern microbiology and the techniques used to identify and safely study microorganisms (primarily bacteria). Some of the areas to be studied include the history of microbiology, structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes, evolution and taxonomy of microbes, metabolism, microbial growth and factors controlling growth, microbial genetics, and immunology. Other topics include the central role microbes play in human health, biotechnology and Earth's ecology. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 3484. Immunology & Infection. 4 Semester Hours.

This course will explore the cellular and molecular mechanisms employed by the mammalian immune system to protect the host from infection by microbial pathogens; we will emphasize the struggle between host defenses and virulence mechanisms of pathogens using select bacteria, protozoa and viruses as examples. This extensive introduction to modern immunology will include the study of the host’s innate defenses, antigen capture and presentation, antibody generation and function, cell mediated immunity, discrimination of self from non-self, and advances in vaccine development. Integrating this with the study of microbial virulence factors and mechanisms of immune evasion, especially, will contribute to a more complete understanding of the interaction between microbe and host. Immunology and microbial pathogenesis are two of the most important areas of biological research and medicine and will enable students to expand upon their previous training in cellular and molecular biology. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332 & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours.).

BL 3490. Developmental Biology. 4 Semester Hours.

Building a multicellular organism from a single, genetically unique cell involves reading and interpreting the genetic "blueprint" as well as the coordination of many complex events. Students will study the mechanisms that underlie the processes of fertilization, pattern formation, morphogenesis, organogenesis and cellular differentiation at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels, with a particular emphasis on animals. The evolution of these developmental mechanisms will be discussed and will serve as a unifying theme in the course. The experimental basis for current models of development will be highlighted in both the lecture and laboratory experiences. The weekly laboratory will incorporate both descriptive and experimental techniques, as well as discussion of primary literature. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 3492. Cell Biology. 4 Semester Hours.

A study of molecular mechanisms responsible for fundamental cell biological processes. Broad areas of emphasis will include organization, function, and assembly of eukaryotic cell components, including proteins, membranes, and membranous or ganelles, the organization of the nucleus,cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular motors. Other topics emphasized will be control of gene expression, membrane traffic and endocytosis, signal transduction and cellular communication, control of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Cellular mechanisms of cancer and human disease will be presented in the context of underlying cellular processes. The laboratory will stress the methodologies used in modern molecular cell biology research, including the analysis of DNA and the use of advanced contrast enhancing and epifluorescent microscopes. An emphasis will be placed on understanding the scientific method through the completion of open ended student projects. Prerequisites: BL 1401, 1402, CH 3411, and concurrent registration in CH 3412. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours.).

BL 3495. Molecular Biology. 4 Semester Hours.

Molecular Genetics of Prokaryotes. Topics can include: structure of the macro molecules protein and DNA, replication of DNA , protein synthesis (transcription and translation), gene repair, mutagenesis, regulation of gene action, bacteriophages, plasmids, transposable elements, recombinant DNA techniques and genetic engineering. Emphasis on problem solving and research. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, BL 2233, CH 3411 and completion of or concurrent registration in CH 3412. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours.).

BL 4440. Mechanisms of Disease. 4 Semester Hours.

This course will examine the biochemical, molecular, and cellular basis of common, economically, and socially important human diseases. A mechanistic approach will allow for an understanding of how the disease develops and manifests itself, as well as an understanding of treatment approaches and current biomedical research. Topics to be covered include: genetic/inherited diseases, metabolic diseases, immunological disorders, infectious diseases, cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, and aging. In the laboratory, students will gain an understanding of how modern methodologies, that are based on basic biochemical, molecular, and cellular principles, are used for the detection, treatment, and research of disease. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 4451. Biochemistry I. 4 Semester Hours.

Study of the processes of life at the molecular level. The physiochemical properties of the biologically important molecules and macromolecules is presented with the goal of understanding their structure vs. biological activity relationships. Major topics include the structures of metabolites, macromolecules, bioenergetics, molecular interactions and reactivities, and an introduction to catalysis by enzymes. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, BL 2233L, CH 3411, CH 3412 (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 4452. Biochemistry II. 4 Semester Hours.

Study of the processes of life at the molecular level. The physiochemical properties of the biologically important molecules and macromolecules is presented with the goal of understanding their structure vs. biological activity relationships. Major topics include bioenergetics, protein dynamics, enzyme mechanisms and their regulation, metabolism, and the integration and regulation of metabolic processes between pathways and between tissues. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, BL 2233L, CH 3411, CH 3412 (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 4472. Immunology. 4 Semester Hours.

Theories and principles of immunology and serology, the immune reaction, hemagglutination, assay, sera preparation. Diagnostic and therapeutic principles. Prerequisites: BL 1401, BL 1402. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours.).

BL 4481. Medical Microbiology. 4 Semester Hours.

A study of microbial pathogenesis focusing on selected medically important microorganisms (bacteria and protozoa) and viruses. Special emphasis will be placed on developing a modern understanding of host-microbe interaction and contemporary public health concerns. Areas to be studied include strategies microorganisms use to evade host immunological defenses and cause damage to the host. In the laboratory, students will employ biochemical, immunological and molecular methods in the identification of microorganisms. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, BL 2233L, & BL 3481. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

BL 4495. Molecular Biology. 4 Semester Hours.

Molecular Genetics of Prokaryotes. Topics can include: structure of the macro molecules protein and DNA, replication of DNA , protein synthesis (transcription and translation), genere pair, mutagenesis, regulation of geneaction, bacteriophages, plasmids, transposable elements, recombinant DNA techniques and genetic engineering. Emphasis on problem solving and research. Prerequisites:BL 1401, 1402, CH 3411 and completion of or concurrent registration in CH3412. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours.).

BL 4497. Genes and Genomes. 4 Semester Hours.

This course will provide students with a strong background in the theory and techniques of modern molecular genetics-a field that impacts virtually all areas of biology and medicine. An emphasis will be placed on understanding the evidence for critical concepts, including gene regulation, genetic engineering of organisms (recombinant DNA), genomics, advances in molecular medicine and DNA forensic science ("DNA fingerprinting"). Technical skills will be developed by utilizing modern techniques, including gel electrophoresis, restriction enzymes, PCR, DNA cloning, gene expression, recombinant protein purification and DNA sequencing utilizing computer-aided analysis of sequence data. Prerequisites: BL 2330, BL 2332, & BL 2233L. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours).

Lori Boies, Ph.D.
Instructor

Veronica Contreras-Shannon, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Susan Colette Daubner, Ph.D.
Professor

Ahmad Galaleldeen, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Christine Gray, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Thomas Macrini, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Lucien Manchester, Ph.D.
Professor

Marshall McCue, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Gary Ogden, Ph.D.
Professor

Timothy Raabe, Ph.D.
Professor

Rosemarie Wahl, Ph.D.
Professor

Larissa Walker, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor