English (EN)

EN 0301. Intermediate Rhetoric & Composition. 3 Semester Hours.

An introductory writing and composition course intended for international undergraduate students whose first language is not English and who do not meet TOEFL/IELTS score requirements for EN 1313 (Rhetoric and Composition for International Students). Emphasis on understanding the structure of a paragraph, function of the topic sentence, supporting details, transitional expressions, and academic grammar usage. Students must pass the course with a grade of C or better in order to progress to EN 1313. This is a non-credit course.

EN 1311. Rhetoric and Composition. 3 Semester Hours.

Emphasis on the composing process, including development and control of authorial voice through pre-writing, shaping, and editing of product. Emphasis on revision for clarification, organization, and refinement of product for audience. Required of all students, regardless of major, and should be taken in the first semester. Must pass with a "C" grade or better.

EN 1312. Rhetoric and Composition II. 3 Semester Hours.

This number is used only to record transfer credit for those students who have taken two semesters of English elsewhere. Elective transfer credit only.

EN 1313. Rhetoric and Composition for International Students. 3 Semester Hours.

Freshman composition course enriched for non-native speakers of English. Instruction in the composing process by studying theory, analyzing model compositions by famous writers, and writing one formal composition a week, in addition to in-class writing exercises. Covers the creating, shaping, and completing stage of writing. A personal tutor is assigned to aid students with specific writing needs.

EN 2323. Survey of International Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

Critical readings of representative works in translation of fiction, essay, poetry, and drama. Critical writing and research based on readings. Prerequisite: EN 1311 or EN 1313.

EN 2352. Survey of British Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

This course will feature selections from the whole range of British Literature, from Beowulf to the present. Critical writing and research based on the readings. Prerequisite: EN 1311 or EN 1313.

EN 2357. American Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

Critical readings from the beginnings to the twenty-first century. Critical writing and research based on the readings. Prerequisite: EN 1311 or EN 1313.

EN 2399. Special Topics in English. 3 Semester Hours.

Special Topics in English (Elective transfer credit only).

EN 3300. Advanced Composition. 3 Semester Hours.

Exercises in the expository essay: the review, critical essay, essay of definition, essay of persuasion, position paper, etc. Focus on writing across majors. Prerequisites: EN 1311 or EN 1313, plus SMC 2304 and, if it is a school-specific requirement, 3 hours of EN 2323, EN 2352, or EN 2357.

EN 3301. Advanced Research Writing Practice. 3 Semester Hours.

Students practice academic writing and research skills. The objectives are to critically analyze scholarly sources and effectively integrate source material into a complex argument. Assignments include prewriting exercises, a critique, a critical annotated bibliography, a literature review, and a statement of proposed research. Writing intensive course.

EN 3302. Advanced Research Writing for Publication. 3 Semester Hours.

Students practice academic writing and research skills. The objectives are to critically analyze scholarly sources and effectively integrate source material into a complex argument. Assignments include prewriting exercises, a critique, a critical annotated bibliography, a literature review, and a statement of proposed research. Ultimately, students will produce and edit a finished essay to submit to a print or web publication identified by the student. Writing intensive course.

EN 3310. Introduction to the Creative Process. 3 Semester Hours.

This course offers strategies for developing verbal expression and for evaluating our own and others’ literary efforts. Students produce short stories and poetry.

EN 3311. Poetry Writing Workshop. 3 Semester Hours.

Through analysis of a wide range of poetry and study of the creative process, students increase their understanding and enjoyment of the art form as they develop their skills as poets. Performance required.

EN 3312. Fiction Writing Workshop. 3 Semester Hours.

Students write fiction, experimenting with a variety of structures and forms, as exemplified in the works of American, British, and International authors.

EN 3313. Linguistics: Grammar as Communication. 3 Semester Hours.

Examination of grammatical structures in written communication. Required for all EN-ED majors. Recommended for all EN and EA Majors and Minors.

EN 3315. Children’s Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

This course includes a critical reading survey of selections of children's literature, identification and perception of literary conventions, types and genres of literature, and an appreciation of the role of children's literature in the transmission of cultural heritage. Models of extension reading activities will be demonstrated and used in school settings. Field experience required.

EN 3321. Persuasive Writing. 3 Semester Hours.

By examining both classical and more recent approaches to persuasive prose, students will learn to write effective claims and convincing arguments. This course is research and writing intensive.

EN 3341. Teaching of Composition. 3 Semester Hours.

Focuses on rhetoric as both theory and practice, studying the history of rhetorical theory from Aristotle to the present, researching recent composing processes and methods for facilitating and developing student writing in today's culturally diverse classroom. Required for all EN-ED majors.

EN 3345. Creative Non Fiction. 3 Semester Hours.

Creative Nonfiction is the literary writing that regularly appears in small magazines, reviews, and journals; in trade magazines like The New Yorker; and in book-length essay and memoir collections. Writers often braid narrative with fictional and poetic techniques and combine portraiture and self-reflection with reportage and critical analysis. They will write about themselves and the real world with grace, power, and personal commitment. Using a variety of categories such as essay, literary journalism, and memoir, writers will use memory, observation, reflection, research, and storytelling to create writing that is richly narrative. Through writing creative nonfiction, writers will be encouraged to delve, inquire, question, explore, probe, meditate, and analyze. Writing intensive.

EN 3350. Introduction to the Critical Study of Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

In this course, students engage an historical approach to literary analysis, an exploration of literary terms and their application, and an investigation of a variety of analytical approaches to literature including theories of formalism, poststructuralism, and eco criticism. Required for all English Majors and Minors, and should be taken as early in the program as possible. Recommended for all EA Majors and Minors.

EN 3351. The History of the English Language. 3 Semester Hours.

In this course, students engage English as a language continually constructed through a dialectic of culture and mind. Situating English within the family of languages, students explore how social, political, economic, and military forces, especially the invasion of England in 1066, have shaped the language that is spoken today.

EN 3352. How English Works. 3 Semester Hours.

In this course, students focus on the syntax of an English sentence. They explore the syntactic foundations of the English language by identifying and learning to intentionally manipulate grammatical structures and their various functions. In doing so, students emerge as stronger writers and editors who can successfully develop within and adapt to a variety of communication environments, ranging from academic prose to poetry, fiction, journalism, and social media.

EN 3361. Poetry Analysis. 3 Semester Hours.

Study of diction, imagery, tone, and theme in poetry. Analysis of types, versification, and the critical language used in the study of poetry.

EN 3362. Fiction Analysis. 3 Semester Hours.

Intensive study of the structures of fiction: narrative voice, characterization, setting, symbol, tone, and theme. Includes a study of novels and short stories by writers such as Henry James, Edith Wharton, Toni Bambara, Jorge LuÍs Borges, Albert Camus, Nadine Gordimer, Doris Lessing, Yukio Mishima.

EN 3363. Drama Analysis. 3 Semester Hours.

Study of drama from many countries. Discussion about dramatic structure, character, plot, setting, dialogue, and theme.

EN 3371. Contemporary Literary Criticism. 3 Semester Hours.

Application of critical approaches, including reader-response, psychoanalytical, mythic, socio-historical, and feminist approaches to works of literature.

EN 3372. Rhetorical Criticism. 3 Semester Hours.

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and tools of describing, analyzing, interpreting and evaluating a variety of texts. Grounded in rhetorical theory, this course will help students learn about the nature, function and effects of communications and develop the skills necessary to produce written, scholarly, analytical critiques.

EN 3381. Modern Short Story. 3 Semester Hours.

Cross-cultural reading of the modern short story; historical development of the genre; theory and practice of short story criticism.

EN 3386. Masterpieces of Drama. 3 Semester Hours.

Study of the greatest plays of the Western world. Emphasis on the genre, and the dramatization of issues and values in cultural contexts. Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Jonson, Moliere, Wycherley, Racine, Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, and modern dramatists.

EN 3391. Author and Work. 3 Semester Hours.

Focus on the body of work by one or two major authors, such as Jane Austen, Edgar Allan Poe, Lessing and Atwood, Joyce and O’Brien, Ernest Hemingway. Emphasis on specific genres developed by writers. Students may also take EN3391/3392.

EN 3392. Author and Work. 3 Semester Hours.

Focus on the body of work by one or two major authors, such as Jane Austen, Edgar Allan Poe, Lessing and Atwood, Joyce and O’Brien, Ernest Hemingway. Emphasis on specific genres developed by writers. Students may also take EN3391/3392.

EN 3395. Bible as Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

This course examines the historical process which culminated in the canonical books of the Bible and study the different genres which constitute those books. The course will also cover the process through which the basic English translations, the King James and Douay-Rheims versions, were made, and trace the influence of biblical allusion and style in the works of several major writers.

EN 4310. American Romanticism: Origins and Development. 3 Semester Hours.

Students study how a distinctly American literature developed through the themes of individuality, nature, the rejection of materialism, and social reform. The course includes the writings of authors such as Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Dickinson, Whitman, Poe, Hawthorne, Stowe, Melville, Douglass, and Jacobs. This is a writing- and research-intensive course.

EN 4312. American Realism and Naturalism. 3 Semester Hours.

The course will probe how the novel as genre in the Age of Realism and Naturalism (Civil War to First World War) expresses the class, racial, and gender tensions of the times. Typical authors read include Twain, James, Howells, Wharton, Jewett, Dreiser.

EN 4321. Southern Experience in Fiction. 3 Semester Hours.

A consideration of the rise of U.S. Southern fiction, examining the historical, cultural, and philosophical forces which gave rise to this literature through the study of the South's fiction and criticism. Authors include Cable, Chopin, Faulkner, O'Connor, Warren, Welty, Gordon, Petry, Wright, Gaines, and Porter.

EN 4331. American Literature Since 1950. 3 Semester Hours.

This course embraces the rise of post-WWII feminine and minority voices. It coincides with America's reluctant assumption of the role of world power and adds significantly to an understanding of ourselves as a diverse people with a distinct culture within the world community. Intensive research and writing are required. (formerly EN 4353).

EN 4351. Medieval English Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

In this course, students explore cultural meaning and literary excellence in a world lit only by fire. The medieval worldview is examined as made manifest in classic works such as in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur.

EN 4361. Renaissance Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

Critical study of selected readings in British prose, poetry, and drama from 1500 to 1600. (formerly EN 3353).

EN 4365. Shakespeare Studies I. 3 Semester Hours.

Taming of the Shrew, Richard II, Henry IV, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, Julius Caesar, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, Lear, Tempest. (formerly EN 4372).

EN 4366. Shakespeare Studies II. 3 Semester Hours.

Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, Midsummer Night's Dream, Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Measure for Measure, Hamlet, Macbeth, Anthony and Cleopatra. (EN 4365 not a prerequisite) (formerly EN 4373).

EN 4375. The Beginnings of the British Novel. 3 Semester Hours.

Correlation of story, narrative voice, and cultural movement from Daniel Defoe to Maria Edgeworth. Interaction between theme and narrative voice with the economic and political events of the 18th Century. Evolution of narrative voice to ideological stance and literary self-consciousness. (formerly EN 3325).

EN 4381. Nineteenth Century British Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

This course will cover the poetry and prose of the Romantic and Victorian periods. The course will consider the influence of historical, social, political, and philosophical thought on the literature and the effect of ideas developed during this time on contemporary thinking. (formerly EN 3358 or EN 3360).

EN 4385. Nineteenth Century British Novel. 3 Semester Hours.

This course studies the different forms of the novel in the Nineteenth Century and the social and cultural reasons for their emergence. Authors whose works may be included are: Emily and Charlotte Bronte, Jane Austin, Charles Dickens, Conan Doyle, and Mary Shelley. (formerly EN 3326).

EN 4398. Modernism. 3 Semester Hours.

The study of Modernism as a concept from its beginnings as a major aesthetic and philosophical revolt to its evolution as it is reflected in literary works.

EN 5325. Classical Literature of the Western World. 3 Semester Hours.

Designed to familiarize the student with the classic works of the Western World from Dante to Moliere, to more recent authors such as Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir. Works selected represent the various literary movements of the Western World. (formerly EN 3342).

EN 5326. Multicultural American Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

A consideration of significant poetry and fiction by authors from Afro-American, Mexican-American, Asian-American, Native American Indian. It examines the historical, cultural, and philosophical aspects of these groups through a study of their literature and criticism. It includes works by writers such as the following: Langston Hughes, Alice Walker, Ernest Gaines, Rudolfo Anaya, Roberta Fernandez, Leslie Silko, N. Scott Momaday.

EN 5327. Mexican American Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

Students examine readings that emphasize the major genres and cultural perspectives in Mexican-American Literature. Students engage in critical reading, critical writing, and critical analysis of these works written in English.

EN 5328. Mexican and Other Latin American Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

20th Century Latin American Literature focusing mainly on Mexican literature from the revolution to the present (Fuentes/Paz). It also incorporates Nobel and award-winning authors of other Latin American cultures (Neruda, Bombal, Valenzuela).

EN 5330. Women Authors. 3 Semester Hours.

This course focuses on the cross-cultural reading of women authors’ texts and the study of the development of a woman's tradition in literature, with an emphasis on the themes, genres, and writing styles created by female authors. Intensive research and writing are required. (formerly EN 4342).

EN 5333. U. S. Latino Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

The course explores the contemporary Hispanic-American authors of Mexican-American background particularly, and also of Cuban-American and Puerto Rican-American backgrounds. A variety of literature including novels, short stories, and poetry will be read and analyzed. Through the works, issues of culture, ethnicity, assimilation, and heritage will be discussed.

EN 5335. Catholic Authors. 3 Semester Hours.

The focus of this course is on the cultural, philosophical, historical, and religious vision of a selection of major catholic authors from early writers such as Dante and Sor Juana Ines. to writers of the present time, such as Shusaku Endo, Flannery O'Connor, Walker Percy.

EN 5340. Literature of Peace and War. 3 Semester Hours.

A consideration of selected International Literature, from ancient Greece to the present, which expresses the concepts of peace and war, violence and non- violence. Emphasis is given to the philosophical and psychological concepts of conflict resolution - personal, historical, and cultural - as they are expressed in literature. It includes poetry, fiction, and film from ancient Greece, Germany, England, Japan, the United States, and other nations. (formerly EN 4393).

EN 5348. Topics in International Literature. 3 Semester Hours.

With International Literature as its focus, this course may develop a cross- cultural theme common to various nations, such as: the world's struggle, marriage and the family, religion and politics, philosophy, and culture. Or the course may concentrate on one nation or region to study its culture, history, philosophy, and religion as portrayed through its literature.

EN 5360. Special Studies. 3 Semester Hours.

Innovative approaches to selected topics in literature: literary genre, history, and criticism. Stress on relationship of literature to other disciplines. It also may include courses within other of the department’s designated areas. Students may take a second version of this course listed as EN5360/5361.

EN 5361. Special Studies. 3 Semester Hours.

Innovative approaches to selected topics in literature: literary genre, history, and criticism. Stress on relationship of literature to other disciplines. It also may include courses within other of the department’s designated areas. Students may take a second version of this course listed as EN5360/5361.

EN 5390. Internship in English. 3 Semester Hours.

This course reinforces academic work by providing students with a range of opportunities for pre-professional workplace experience. Open to juniors and seniors only. Internships must follow general University guidelines and be approved by the Internship Coordinator. A second Internship (EN 5391) may be taken as an elective to further develop skills acquired in the first internship or to acquire different skills.

EN 5391. Internship in English. 3 Semester Hours.

This course reinforces academic work by providing students with a range of opportunities for pre-professional workplace experience. Open to juniors and seniors only. Internships must follow general University guidelines and be approved by the Internship Coordinator. A second Internship (EN 5391) may be taken as an elective to further develop skills acquired in the first internship or to acquire different skills.

EN 5394. Research in English and Cultural Studies. 3 Semester Hours.

This course introduces students to advanced qualitative research methods applicable to English, Cultural Studies, and related or interdisciplinary fields. The sheer volume and fluidity of information as well as the constantly changing portals for accessing information requires different ways of thinking about, doing, and teaching research. The course helps students re-think writing, presentation, and publication in light of changing expectations.

EN 5395. Senior English Capstone. 3 Semester Hours.

Required of English majors and those with a concentration in English. The seminar focuses on developing the student's understandings and skills acquired through the study of Language, Literature, and Writing. The course is normally given only in the fall semester, so it should be taken in the fall of the senior year.