Physics (PY)

All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.

PY 1300. Physics Concepts & Application. 3 Semester Hours.

Designed to convey the considerable bearing physical laws have on common experience. Applications in trades, professions and industry are provided. Directed to ward non-science majors to help them evaluate the evidence of their own experience and see the pervasiveness of physics in virtually every aspect of technological society. Topics: Motion, Gravity, Relativity, Energy and Power, Energy Resources, Waves, Sound and Electricity.

PY 1310. Modern Astronomy. 3 Semester Hours.

A course that will be of interest to students not majoring in science, engineering or mathematics as well as those majoring in these fields. This course deals mainly with stellar and galactic astronomy but begins with a brief survey of our solar system including orbits and Kepler's laws. The emphasis is placed upon how compositions, ages and evolution are deduced. The course will be somewhat quantitative but the mathematical requirements are minimal.

PY 1401. General Physics I. 4 Semester Hours.

First semester: mechanics, sound and heat. Second semester: electricity, light, atomic and nuclear physics. Intended for non-physics and non-engineering students. (Fall; Spring; Summer) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours.) (PHYS 1401).

PY 1402. General Physics II. 4 Semester Hours.

First semester: mechanics, sound and heat. Second semester: electricity, light, atomic and nuclear physics. Intended for non-physics and non-engineering students. (Fall; Spring; Summer) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours.) (PHYS 1402).

PY 1404. University Physics I. 4 Semester Hours.

Calculus based physics course intended for physics and engineering students. This course covers the basics of Newtonian Mechanics including kinematics and dynamics of linear and rotating systems. The energy and momentum approach is also covered in this course as are applications of these concepts to rotational dynamics, simple harmonic oscillations, thermodynamics, acoustics and fluid mechanics. (Fall; Spring; Summer) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours.) Co-requisite MT 2412 (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

PY 2404. University Physics II. 4 Semester Hours.

Calculus based physics course intended for physics and engineering students. This course covers the concepts of waves and optics, electricity, DC and AC circuits, and magnetism. (Spring; Summer) (Lecture 3 hours; Lab 4 hours.) Prerequisites PY1404, MT 2412 (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

PY 3101. Modern Physics Lab. 1 Semester Hour.

This course focuses on the exploration of modern scientific methods through the measurement of several classical and modern physical constants. Experiments include: e/m, Millikan Oil Drop, Photo-electric Effect, Speed of Light, Franck-Hertz, plus additional experiments available in the department. (Fall only) (Lab 4 hours per week; usually con current with PY 3301.).

PY 3102. Nuclear Physics Lab. 1 Semester Hour.

This course focuses on the experiments relevant to the behavior of atomic nuclei including studies of nuclear decay, nucleon scattering, radiation scattering. (Lab 4 hours per week; usually concurrent with PY 3302.).

PY 3113. Electronics Lab I. 1 Semester Hour.

DC circuits; the diode as a nonlinear device; the oscilloscope; RC circuits; RC filters; LC resonant circuit; rectifier; signal diodes; diode clamp; emitter follower; current source; common emitter amplifier; transistor as a switch; op-amp open-loop gain; inverting and non-inverting op-amps; op-amp follower and current source; summing amplifier; op-amp as an integrator, a differentiator, an active rectifier, and an active clamp; FET transistor; FET current source and source follower; FET as a voltage-controlled resistance; amplitude modulation and AM radio; input and output characteristics of integrated gates: TTL and CMOS. Prerequisite: EG 2152; corequisite: EG 3356. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

PY 3114. Electronics Laboratory II. 1 Semester Hour.

Flip-flops; counters; shift registers; the cascading 16-bit counter with added display and keypad; programmable divide-by-n counters; period meters; capacitance meters; memory; RAM; divide-by-3; memory-based state machines; the dynamic diode curve tracer; the grounded emitter amplifier; current sources; the Ebers-Moll model; push-pull amplifiers; differential amplifiers; the bootstrap circuit; the Miller effect; the Darlingtonpair; the super beta; the analog switch and its applications: chopper circuits; sample-and-hold circuits; switched capacitor filters; voltage inverter circuits; A/D and D/A converters; the phase-locked loop circuit; the frequency multiplier. Prerequisite: EG 3156; Co-requisite: EG 3357. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

PY 3125. Special Topics Laboratory. 1 Semester Hour.

PY 3301. Modern Physics. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is an introductory course in non-classical physics for students who have completed calculus-based physics. It is intended to introduce students to the frontiers of physics. Topics include: special relativity, basic ideas of quantum mechanics with experiments that revolutionized our understanding of nature, and lead to the development of new fields such as atomic and molecular physics, condensed matter physics, nuclear and elementary particle physics. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Fall only).

PY 3302. Nuclear Physics. 3 Semester Hours.

A course that focuses on the scientific study of the properties and behavior of atomic nuclei instruction in nuclear reaction theory, quantum mechanics, energy conservation, nuclear fission and fusion, strong and weak atomic forces, nuclear modeling, nuclear decay, nucleon scattering, pairing, photon and electron reactions, statistical methods, and research equipment operation and maintenance. (Lab 4 hours per week) Prerequisite: PY 3301. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

PY 3304. Thermodynamics. 3 Semester Hours.

This course focuses on the basic concepts of thermodynamics from the microscopic point of view. Methods of statistical physics are used to define entropy and temperature, heat and work, ideal gas behavior. Applications to chemical reactions, Fermi and Bose systems in condensed matter physics and phase transformations are discussed. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

PY 3305. Physical Optics. 3 Semester Hours.

Physical principles are used to develop a firm fundamental understanding of optics and imaging. Main topics include light as an electromagnetic wave, light at an interface, polarization, interference, and diffraction. Also includes a brief introduction to modern optics and a discussion of the fundamental limitations of an optical system and its effect on images. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

PY 3307. Mechanics. 3 Semester Hours.

This course presents kinematics and dynamics of particles using Newtonian, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian techniques. Topics include central force motion, oscillations and normal mode analysis, non-linear dynamics, rotating rigid bodies and motion in non-inertial reference frames. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

PY 3308. Quantum Mechanics. 3 Semester Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics and includes following topics: formal development of the postulates of quantum theory, representation of states, quantum mechanics in one and three dimensions, angular momentum, spin and perturbation theory. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

PY 3309. Electromagnetics. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is an intermediate level discussion of Maxwell's Equations and their applications: electrostatics and dynamics, magnetic fields and magnetic effects, and electro-magnetic waves, both in vacuum and in materials. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.) (Spring only).

PY 3313. Electronics. 3 Semester Hours.

Theory of semiconductors; discrete devices and integrated circuits; linear and digital operation. (EG 2341, EG 2152, EG 2352, EG 2353 are prerequisites.) Note: PY 1404 and PY 2404 are prerequisites and MT 3311 is a co-requisite for 3000 level physics courses. (same as EG3356) (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

PY 3314. Electronics. 3 Semester Hours.

Theory of semiconductors; discrete devices and integrated circuits; linear and digital operation. (EG 2341, EG 2152, EG 2352, EG 2353 are prerequisites.) Note: PY 1404 and PY 2404 are prerequisites and MT 3311 is a co-requisite for 3000 level physics courses. (same as EG3357) (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).

PY 3325. Special Topics. 3 Semester Hours.

This course is used to introduce special topics of interest. Topics in past have included the following: Particle Physics, Biophysics, Functional Neuro imaging, Fiesta of Physics Outreach, Advanced Electromagnetric theory and Advanced Quantum Mechanics. Note: PY 1404 and PY 2404 are prerequisites and MT 3311 is a co-requisite for 3000 level physics courses. (All courses serving as prerequisites in the School of Science, Engineering and Technology must be completed with a “C” or better in order to advance to the next sequenced course.).