Anthropology

School

College of Arts, Humanities and Social Science

School Dean

Leona Pallansh, Ph.D.

Department

Anthropology

Anthropology is the scientific study of human diversity throughout the world and throughout time. Anthropology is a broad and diverse field typically divided into four general areas of study: Archaeology, Physical/ Biological, Linguistics, and Cultural. The minor in in anthropology at St. Mary’s University emphasizes the cultural diversity of humans both past and present with specific interest in peoples’ beliefs, practices, and the cognitive and social organization of human groups. Students will examine how ideas about cultures have evolved over time and how anthropology analyzes cultural diversity and change. This minor engages students in critical cultural thinking about pressing social and global issues and adds depth to any major through core skills in cultural interpretation and analysis, ethnographic methods, writing, and communication.

To enroll in this minor, students should contact the undergraduate academic advisor in their major department and the current anthropology advisor, Dr. Janet Armitage.

AN 2331. Cultural Anthropology. 3 Semester Hours.

An examination of the unity and diversity of cultural patterns in both simple and complex societies, including consideration of their political, intellectual, technical, aesthetic, and other social institutions in cross-cultural perspective.

AN 2332. Introduction to Archaeology. 3 Semester Hours.

Introduction to scientific study of past human life through material remains. Insights into the evolution of civilization, past cultural, economic, and organizational systems, etc.

AN 3300. Special Topics in Anthropology. 3 Semester Hours.

Topics vary from semester to semester. AN 3300 may be retaken for additional credit when a different topic is offered.

AN 3301. North American Indians. 3 Semester Hours.

Survey of Indians from the time of European contact through the present, emphasizing the situation of contemporary Native Americans.

AN 3302. Ancient Civilization of the Americas. 3 Semester Hours.

Survey of prehistoric civilizations of the Americas, particularly the Aztecs, Mayas, and Incas. Deals with their development and histories, political and economic structures, religion, etc.

AN 3303. Human Origins. 3 Semester Hours.

This course covers come of the major components of biological anthropology with a major focus on human evolution. It presents scientific data tracing the emergence of humans as a culture-bearing species. It examines evolutionary processes, taxonomic principles, the fossil record and the early developments of human culture.

AN 3309. Medical Anthropology. 3 Semester Hours.

This course examines a variety of issues related to health, illness, and health care from an anthropological perspective. It explores how people in various cultures, both Western and non-Western deal with illness, disease, birth, death, curing and maintaining health.

AN 3312. Language and Culture. 3 Semester Hours.

Examines the dynamics between language and culture in cross-cultural perspective. It explores the functions and use of language in society, the symbolic nature of language, theories regarding the evolution of human language, linguistic change, and how humans use language in social contexts.

AN 3355. Internship in Anthropology. 3 Semester Hours.

Experiential education related to the theoretical and research topics studied in sociology. The experience consists of pre-professional work in social agencies, community programs, and other appropriate settings approved by the department. Junior/Senior status and at least 9 hours of upper-division sociology are prerequisites. Involves written sociological analysis. 3 to 6 semester hours of credit, with a maximum of 3 hours per semester.